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Tampon Discussion
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GrammieLove posted:
My 3.5 yr. old granddaughter has been exposed to tampon usage by her Mom. (Where they go, etc.)

Am I just being old-fashioned to believe this is TOO young to have such exposure? At what age should this type of exposure and discussion be happening?
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mrswhitecastle responded:
It may not have been a planned discussion. Sometimes it is hard for a Mom to get privacy. I know if I don't remember to lock the door, I usually have "visitors" with me in the bathroom.

If one of my DD's barged in on me while I was in the bathroom, I may have to explain what I was doing so they wouldn't be completely freaked out. I wouldn't really PLAN on talking to either girl that early, but I can see a situation when I would HAVE to explain something to them.
Emily (7) Elizabeth (5)
 
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GrammieLove replied to mrswhitecastle's response:
I can understand the "visitor" situation; however, it has created an unhealthy curiosity for my GD. She's been trying to shove things into her body. She even said she and Mommy play a "tampon in your face" game! She's such a copy-cat. She has obviously seen her Mom showering, as she mimics shaving her legs, etc.

We are just not accustomed to this from our 3-yr. old.
 
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earleyml1012 responded:
My 4 yr old has walked into the bathroom while I've been changing either a tampoon or pad. When she asks when it is, I tell her the name of the product just not what it's used for. I just tell her that it's something she will need to use when she's much older and that for now she's not suppose to put anything in her private or underware. That seemed to be enough for my daughter.

I think playing a game about or with tampoons is a little much for a child this young. Hopefully she doesn't try to insert anything in herself...that's a scary thought.
 
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GrammieLove replied to earleyml1012's response:
That is why we are concerned as grandparents. She did try to put a toy into herself during bath time and I had to tell her not to do that. We see our granddaughter so seldom. Therefore, we are worried what may be happening with her on a daily basis ... bad influences, etc.

We don't want to appear as alarmists, but we are concerned for the emotional and well being of our granddaughter. The last time we raised the red flag that something was "not right", DFACS was called. All that came of that, was we now have very little access to our GD, because the Mom got mad at us. (Our son, the Dad is attempting to gain full custody.)

There is lots behind the scenes, but mostly we question the parenting skills of the Mom to keep our GD SAFE!
 
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earleyml1012 replied to GrammieLove's response:
I'm so sorry to hear this. This is tough when the parents aren't together and they are battling over the child. I'm sure that even adds to your GD's behavior. If your son is fighting for full custody, I would document the things your GD is doing and what she tells you is happening at home. To me the mother's behavior with this issue is not healthy. Why would you teach a 3.5 yr old about putting things into herself? They are too young to fully understand the concept of what it is ok and what is not ok to put in there. I feel for your GD. Hang in there! And good luck with the custody battles!
 
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GrammieLove replied to earleyml1012's response:
Thanks! We have been in the custody battle just over a year, following the Mom's "boyfriend" who inflicted excessive bruisings on our GD. Since she was 2 1/2 at the time, it was his word against hers, but she is very articulate for her age and clearly told her Daddy what happened. Unfortunately, the courts did not rule in our GD's favor. She is still in danger, and so we are holding our breath until he does it again. That is why we are constantly on the lookout for anything abnormal. We do document everything! And, we know as she is able to communicate even more, it will just be a matter of time when all is revealed.

We keep her covered in prayer and our son keeps pressing in the courts. He is military (state-side) and wants to be with his daughter in the worst way. We are praying the legal system will see truth SOON before it's too late.


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