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sleepless 10 year old
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tish99 posted:
My ten year old has lots of trouble getting to sleep. I have tried putting him to bed earlier, not giving him pop at night, letting him listed to his mp3, sitting and talking awhile b4 he goes to bed. I feel I have tried about everything and he still stays up. He says he has a lot of trouble falling asleep and that he wakes up through the night. Need help Please!!!!
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OneAndDone responded:
I take a while to wind down, and so does my DS. He can take > 30 minutes to fall asleep after lights-out, and because he's an extrovert, he gets wound up by interaction. I figure he has to learn how to fall asleep by himself. So after lights-out, if I go back in, I try to make it brief, and I only whisper. It's quiet in his room, no music, no people, nice and quiet and peaceful. I tell DS to think nice thoughts when he says he can't sleep, and I leave so he can work it out himself. I don't think you can teach someone how to fall asleep, they have to work it out themselves. And if DS is in a quiet, peaceful environment, lying down, he's resting and that counts. Too much worrying about sleep keeps a person up, so tell DS it's fine to lie there quietly and wait for sleep to come. Sleep tips: if he's getting caffeinated drinks during the day, cut off the caffeine at noon. You're probably doing this but a short (30 min) bedtime routine is helpful: bath or shower, read books in a room with the lights already dimmed, same thing every night will help set the stage for the body to realize it's time to start winding down. No TV before bed. If DS is waking at night to use the bathroom, limit drinks 1-2 hours before bedtime. Good luck.
 
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Louise_WebMD_Staff responded:
Does he play video games before bed?
 
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JLinsky responded:
Has this always been a problem for your son? Does he snore? Does he move around a lot when he sleeps? If all three of these are true, you might talk to your pediatrician about having a sleep study done. My older son had trouble falling and staying asleep pretty much since he was a baby, he snored, he slept restlessly. When he was nine, we had a sleep study done, and it turned out that he had obstructive sleep apnea - his tonsils were interfering with his breathing at night. He woke 67 times during the sleep study, and had multiple episodes during which he didn't breathe for over 20 seconds - the longest episode was 47 seconds.

He had his tonsils and adenoids out, and his sleep is so much better now. However, it wasn't a miracle cure. He's still anxious about whether he will be able to fall asleep. So he still wants someone to help him fall asleep, and sometimes still needs help getting back to sleep in the middle of the night. Its much easier though, now - just lying down with him for 5 minutes usually does the trick. Also, we thought his school performance would improve with better sleep but it didn't really change.
 
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tish99 replied to Louise_WebMD_Staff's response:
No we shut video games off at 8.
 
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fcl replied to tish99's response:
What time does he go to bed at?
 
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navywife32000 replied to fcl's response:
My 11 year old has the same problem but she has ADHD. Does he? I know that no mother wants their child on medication but we had to. She takes 25mg of Trazadone, which is a small amount but enough to get her to sleep and stay asleep. We put ours to bed at 8 at night but she gets up at 6


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