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    6 year old wetting herself
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    StrugglingMommy posted:
    Ok... my 6 year old has started for about the last 5 months wetting on herself. Day and Night. She is an extremely sound sleeper so I can kinda see it at night however not during the day. I have tried everything from just talking to her, ignoring it, time out, taking what she loves most from her, whipped her (hardest thing to do ever and WON'T do that again), made her do all the laundry, and now I just have no idea what to do. Nothing has helped. Thought about doing a reward system where if she goes all day that we put a marble in a jar and when it is full or we have went so long that she gets a reward of some kind. But their are mixed emotions on that with my husband (step dad) and I. I did take her to the doctor and tested for UTI. She does not have one. She doesn't have the problem at school just at home. .... HELP please! I am just at my wits end.
    Reply
     
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    momuv4girls responded:
    So, it sounds like you're saying this is new in the last 5 or so months?
    Prior to that, your daughter didn't have these "accidents" ?
    She was dry at night and didn't wet herself in the day?

    If that is the case, then it sounds like this is an emotional issue.
    Young children who face divorce, lifestyle disruption (moving, new school, new sibling etc..) often can not verbally express their inner turmoil, and unwittingly begin behaviors - - wetting is a common one.

    I will paste a few articles for you to read and explore - I hope you will find them helpful and give you some sort of direction that will help you help your daughter.
    http://www.aacap.org/cs/root/facts_for_families/bedwetting

    http://www.minddisorders.com/Del-Fi/Enuresis.html

    Take care,
    -Kathleen
     
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    mrswhitecastle responded:
    In my opinion, kids don't wet themselves on purpose. There is some underlying reason that they cannot help, whether it be physical or emotional. Therefore, IMO, I don't think that punishments or rewards help.

    I would take her back to the pedi to determine the cause. Could she be constipated? Could she now have a UTI? Could it be an emotional issue?

    My daughter would wet her pants when she was constipated. So, I know it is frustrating, and hard, and messy to deal with. While trying to find the underlying cause, I would keep telling myself that she can't help it, and think about how embarrassed and bad it makes her feel when she does it.

    Hang in there, and see what the pedi has to say.
    Emily (7) Elizabeth (5)
     
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    StrugglingMommy replied to mrswhitecastle's response:
    We had problems about 4 years ago now with wetting and it took the doctors a year to figure out that she was constipated. She takes Miralax on the regular now. So she shouldn't be constipated and I am constantly asking her if she has pooped. I did have her tested to see if she had a UTI. And that came back negative. This has happened on and off a few times.

    Emotionally..... I got married in October and we moved from WV to NC in December. New school and step dad. Hours away from her dad which I can see being an issue. I just don't know how to help her.
     
    avatar
    momuv4girls replied to StrugglingMommy's response:
    I would say that is a lot of change, and your daughter may benefit from seeing a Child Psychologist to help her cope.

    All children are different, and some are very sensitive to their environment and do not do well with disruption/change.

    Here are some tips on finding a good/qualified Psychologist...
    http://depression.about.com/od/howtochooseadoctor/a/Find-a-Psychologist.htm

    When looking for a qualified Dr. to see my young daughter, I followed those suggestions. I also found it very helpful to meet with and "interview" the prospective Dr. to see if I found her a good fit for my daughter. It actually took me 3 interviews before finding one, but it was totally worth the effort and time.

    Hope this helps, and good luck!!
    -Kathleen
     
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    Anon_475 replied to momuv4girls's response:
    I agree with all of the above posters and wanted to add - please STOP punishing her! You're only making things worse!
     
    avatar
    meganamom responded:
    It's No Accident: Breakthrough Solutions to...
    I think you should read this book...seems like it will give you specific medical insight on what is happening with your daughter and how to treat it.
    Rather than punishment she probably needs lots of extra attention right now. Read books together in the evening when life is calm... then chat with her about school, her new home, her new step dad.
    The children's book, Prince Bravery & Grace: Attack of the ... is a great book for kids who wet at night.


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