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    My 3yr old boy doesn't talk
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    BADxKARMA posted:
    My 3yr old son doesn't talk much. He says "mama" & baba, and makes tons of sounds, but nothing else. He can at times be overly aggressive, and he breaks things frequently. He's generally a happy boy, loves swimming, being read to, playing games, etc. We've taken him to doctors, schools, specialists, and they all say they can't find anything wrong, but my wife & I are worried. We are a low-income family, so he hasn't had CT scans or anything. It gets harder & harder the older he gets. I just want to have discussions with him, ask him what he wants to eat, where he wants to go, what movie or show he wants to watch or book he wants to read. He has never told us he loves us... Please help.
    Reply
     
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    fcl responded:
    Have him evaluated by Early Intervention.
     
    avatar
    Roy Benaroch, MD responded:
    This thread includes two links to articles I've written here about this:

    http://forums.webmd.com/3/parenting-exchange/forum/3408

    In most states, Early Intervention programs end at the third birthday. You ought to be able to get a speech evaluation and speech therapy services at the local public school at your son's age. I strongly recommend you look into that.
     
    avatar
    BADxKARMA replied to Roy Benaroch, MD's response:
    He has been evaluated by Early intervention, specialists, teachers, hearing & speech experts, doctors, etc. ad nauseum. They all say the same thing; they can't find anything wrong with him. He's outgoing, playful, extremely strong and agile, loves swim, climb, run, play catch, to laugh & play games. He can identify colors, shapes, creatures, colors, the whole shebang. He just doesn't talk He points to what he wants, or he shows us what he wants, or he drags us to whatever he wants. I could get by with that, but when he cries & I don't know if he's hungry or he hurt himself, if he had a bad dream or it's growing pains, it just tears my heart out. That and I would donate major organs just to be able to have a conversation with him, hear him say "Love you Poppa", just one time. Any other thoughts?
     
    avatar
    Roy Benaroch, MD replied to BADxKARMA's response:
    I'm not sure I understand the statement that they can't find anything wrong with him. He doesn't talk. That's something wrong. Are they saying his lack of speech is normal?

    He ought to be in speech therapy, which can help him learn the speech skills he needs. In most states, this will be offered though the local public school, starting at age 3. Best of luck!


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