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Raising fit Kids

Shortness of breath and rapid heartbeat
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An_253812 posted:
My daughter is 9 years old has been a healthy kid until recently she was complaining of shortness of breath at school while trying to run during gym. Spoke with the school nurse and she tells us she believes she has exercise induced asthma. We make an appointment with her dr. He recommends we do a chest X-day and a PFT. We go back for results two weeks later in the mean time she continues to have episodes and one of them occurs while She is laying down in bed. We go for results he tells us X-ray is good and PFT is good except for she has a moderate decreased diffusion capacity and refers us to a Pulmonary pediatric specialist. Yesterday she has another episode at school. This is 5 times now with in three weeks. Dr gave her an inhaler to try and help her for right now. She said she used it before gym and had an episode anyways. She also states that she has a rapid heartbeat. I'm very concerned it could e something very serious. Please any insight would be great! We have two weeks before we see the specialist. Sorry for any errors I'm typing on my phone. Please help! Thank you!!
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