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Vision problems
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lovedogs1955 posted:
I am noticing that I am having significant problems with my eyes when I shift from reading or doing close hand work to then looking at something else, like the TV or a person sitting across from me. Is this problem caused by muscles that help with vision accommodation being slow or stiff?
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worn1 responded:
bumping to the top so Dr Stacy will see it
There are none so blind as those that will not see
 
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lovedogs1955 replied to worn1's response:
thanks, worn1. I know my body has been going through some changes lately with things like memory and physical stamina. I guess the eyes are all part of it!
 
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Mark A Stacy, MD responded:
It can be. Do you notice any double vision when looking near or far? Or is your vision clearer when you cover one eye? If either are true, you may wish to talk with your neurologist or ophthalmologist
 
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lovedogs1955 replied to Mark A Stacy, MD's response:
I mainly notice just severe blurriing and actual eye pain. I'll have to try covering one eye and see what happens. I am near-sighted anyway and have worn glases for most of my life. Bifocals for at least 12 years. I do find that when I read, especially when lying down, I automatically keep one eye closed without even thinking about it.

I don't know which doctor to see----would it be better to see Neuro first?
 
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worn1 replied to lovedogs1955's response:
Dr Stacy please respond to her reply question.
lovedogs1955 On my first visit to the neurologist I was so far along without treatment my sight was messed up. Still is to a certian extent. Before I was diagnosed I took up 2 lanes thinking I was driving down one. I blinked so rarly she assigned eye drops. The parkinsons meds helped with most of the problem. The problems I still have are caused to my eyes no longer work together. I have to shut one eye when I read. I have problems falling asleep driving during the day but no problems staying awake when its dark. Car lights and street lights bother my eyes so I use sun glasses. works like a charm. When I took the eye exam last time I discovered I have to read the front half with my left eye and the right half with the right eye. I have adjusted to the problems and hardly notice it anymore. The sunglasses were the biggest help. Just as you have adjusted to other problems your body will adjust to this also. I have seen both, opthomologist and neurologist. Both think the right prescription should solve the problem. It hasn't .
w
There are none so blind as those that will not see
 
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lovedogs1955 replied to worn1's response:
Worn1, thanks so much for sharing your eye problems! I also have dry eyes, and have been using eye drops rec, by Opthalmologist for years. My last vision exam was about 6 months ago and I was having some blurring problems then, which he kind of dismissed and told me to use eye drops more often. I also have problems with night vision and have had that special coating put on my lenses whenever i get new Rx/glasses. I don't worry about it too much since I am not able to drive anymore.

I know that in all of my boning up on PD, I have read about viision problems, but it isn't always discussed in the materials and when it is, a solution or coping mechinisms are not even brought up.

Hey, more information to add to continuing ed for health care professionals, Dr. Stacy!!
 
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lepman replied to Mark A Stacy, MD's response:
I talked with my ophthalmologist about my blurred and double vision, I thought I just needed a new perscription, but he told me I have Oily eye? I also told him about haveing trouble while keeping my eyes fixed on something close my vision shuffels objects around and sometimes blends them together . He didn't have an answer for that....
 
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worn1 replied to Mark A Stacy, MD's response:
Good Morning Dr Stacy
Is there any research being performed on sight problems related to Parkinson's? I bet if all of the Parkinson community responed it would be over whelming(SP).

w
There are none so blind as those that will not see
 
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Mark A Stacy, MD replied to worn1's response:
Hi, Worn1
There are some pockets of PD research in the area of vision. Below is an excerpt on vision work from a review I wrote for International Journal of Neuroscience:

Visual Disturbances
Impaired visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, color discrimination, temporal sensitivity, motion perception, peripheral visual field sensitivity, visual processing, ocular surface irritation, altered tear film, decreased blink rate, and decreased convergence amplitudes are common in PD [85, 86>. Electrophysiologic testing suggests retinal ganglion cell impairment plays a role in the loss of acuity, and prolonged visual evoked potentials and abnormal electroretinographic patterns are seen [87>. Interestingly, both of these neurophysiologic assessments respond to levodopa [88, 89>. Motor disturbances have been attributed to visual hallucinations, double vision and estimating spatial relations, and most often produced freezing of gait [90>.
 
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lovedogs1955 replied to lepman's response:
Hey Lepman, I also have that problem when keeping my eyes fixed on something. My right eye tends to blur and maybe that word "shuffle" describes what I feel. No matter what I do, I can't stop it from happening.
 
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lovedogs1955 replied to Mark A Stacy, MD's response:
Well, it looks like we all are having at least one of the problems you have referenced in your response, Dr. Stacey. I am assuming that the cause of visual problems we are talking about all stem from the same thing that causes "freezing" and muscle cramping/pain. Impairment of the neuro-recepters-----we have "blocked highways" so to speak and the messages that our brain sends to the body are either impaired or not received at all. Is that right?

So, I am gathering that there really isn't anything that can be done to hel with these problems, so we need to develop coping mechanisms. (Good thing I am having coffee right now so I can think better!) I am not able to tolerate the PD meds, so we are treating the symptoms/problems as they occur. I wish more medical professionals had a better understanding of what goes on with PD. I have found that most doctors sort of shrug their shoulders when asked about things like our vision problems.
 
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worn1 replied to lovedogs1955's response:
lovedogs1955 I have come to the conclusion that doctors do not tell us what we can expect when we are first diagnosed.
If they did it would scare the hell out of us. Just think if a doctor told you a disease is slowly destroying you through destruction of your brain with only meds to slow the progress down you would freak. There has to be a way of stopping the domino affect. If we could break the chain of destruction and get the cells--do not remember the name--to take on the function of producing dopamine it would be a start.
I wonder how many people with Parkinsons had problems with shingles before there diagnosis. I had an attack of shingles which attacked the 7th nerve causing paralysis on the left side of my face. after I recovered I started having symptoms of Parkinson's. Since it lays dormant in the brain I wonder what triggers the out break and if what ever triggers the out break also triggers Parkinsons or is it shingles itself that triggers Parkinson.
I know the chemicals I was exposed to in the military can cause it. I wonder what else. Cleaners used in the house?
I think I am going to do a little more research. I will let you know what I find out
w
There are none so blind as those that will not see
 
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worn1 replied to Mark A Stacy, MD's response:
Thanks Dr Stacy
Have you thought about placing a short paragraph on any subject pertaining to Parkinson's. Call it did you know. You would be educating those with Parkinson,s and their support partner. Maybe once a month. I know you are busy but it would be appreciated.
w
There are none so blind as those that will not see
 
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lovedogs1955 replied to worn1's response:
That's a super idea, worn1. I agree that the medical professionals don't really tell us what could be in our futures, but some education along the way would be SO beneficial. Like I have mentioned before, I am a disabled RN, who had over 32 years of experience before I had to retire. I knew very little about PD other than it causes tremors and eventually, some patients develop dementia.

It would be so nice to have the various speciallists that I see (because of other chronic medical conditions) had some working knowledge of PD. This darn vision problem that it seems several of us seem to have is a good example. Our Opthalmologists should be able to help us determine whether or no they can give us some real assistance, other than changing Rx lenses or just saying that it must be "old age."


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