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BELL'S PALSY
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OLIVERRIC posted:
HELLO SUPPORT GRUP I'VE JUST BEEN DIAGNOSED SO MY QUESTIONS ARE PRETTY BASIC: 1) IS BELL'S PALSY COMMUNICABLE? (I HAVE A GF) 2) IS IT LIKELY TO RECUR? (I AM 65) THANK YOU. OLIVERRIC
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RedBear2005 responded:
Bell's Palsy -- IF that is actually what you are experiencing -- is not communicable. However, be aware that such a diagnosis is generally considered to be one of exclusion . That is, the label is often used for symptoms of facial paralysis when the examining physician finds no other disorder which fits. If you'd like to read up from sources other than Web-MD (which is actually pretty good - try the term in the search window above), then here is another view: www.bellspalsy.ws/treatment.htm In the 16 years I've been supporting facial pain patients as a layman advocate, I have heard of cases where Bells (or at least facial paralysis of unknown origin) can recur after periods of remission. Overall, I don't think this is the typical outcome. The same site above suggests that the rough figures are on the order of 10-20%. See Frequently Asked Questions at www.bellspalsy.ws/ Feel free to come back with further information on your overall symptoms, Oliver. Several of us on the board are well grounded in this general field, though none of us is medically licensed. Go in Peace and Power, Red


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