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Miss Ann's seizures
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ncalford posted:
My 9 year old female cocker spaniel (22 lbs) will have spells that cause her to tremble all over and and she can't stand. I hold her close until the spell passes and then I have to put her outside because she will always throw up. At the end of the past 3 spells when I put her outside she not only vomits, but also she has a large BM. Once it's over she's fine. It seems the spells are coming closer together. She woke me up at 2:30 am this morning when she started having the last episode. She is a very active dog and has always been somewhat hyper. What could it be?
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AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
Sandy Willis, DVM, DACVIM responded:
Hello Ncalford,

As your cocker's spells are coming occuring more frequently, this would be a great time to see your veterinarian and determine what the cause might be.

If they are true seizures, we worry about them clustering such that the spells last a dangerously long time. Does your dog lose consciousness? Does she shake her legs violently or is it truly just a trembling?

We can see partial seizures in dogs. Epilepsy usually results in seizure activity in dogs younger than 5 years of age, older than that, we worry about problems with low blood sugar, low calcium sometimes liver disease and of course brain disorders.

Some of these problems would seem unusual in a dog that was fine between the episodes but you just never know.

I would make an appointment with your veterinarian to have your dog checked over and perhaps to do some blood work to rule-out organ problems, glucose, etc. It would even help your veterinarian if you could record one of these episodes so they can see what you are experiencing.

If you dog has an episode that continues over more than a couple of minutes, you need to contact an emergency center so take her in to your family veterinarian before the problem becomes this severe.

Happy holidays,

Dr. Sandy


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