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Myboxer has started showing signs of aggression towards myslef and my american bull dog
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susanblatz65 posted:
I need some advice. I have a boxer male that is neutered he has started shwoing signs of aggression towards myself and my other male neutered dog. It is to the point that I am afraid of him and he knows this. This evening he tried to attack me for no reason at all. He had the opportunity to bite me but he grawled and sort of jump towards me. Is there medications that can be used to treat aggression? What can I do to help him with this problem? Any information given would be greatly appreciated.
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Violets_are_Blue responded:
Sometimes a thyroid gland not producing enough hormones can cause dogs to act aggressive. This can be treated by giving a medication twice daily. However, it needs to be tested with a blood test to see if it is the cause. A full panel should be run to determine if anything else could be causing the aggressiveness but your statement that 'he knows this' gives me concern that medication will not help him. If everything turns out peachy keen with his blood work and there's no medical reason for his aggressiveness, it would be best to turn to a professional trainer or behaviorist to deal with it then. It will take time with them and consistency. Most professionals do want a full medical check-up before they begin training since they don't want to waste your money for taking a dog into them when it's a medical condition.

However, if you feel that you can not control him even with training, it would be best to start thinking of rehoming him (and give the new owners information about his aggressiveness). The decision to euthanize him is a very hard one but if all other options have been tried and exhausted or his aggressiveness becomes worse even with medication/training, it would be kinder to do that than have him live in a kennel away from human contact with people too fearful to come near him. I wish you good luck with this and hope he responds to something positive.


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