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Dog Has Neurological Symptoms
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An_244548 posted:
My dog very recently started acting a little strange. She's a 4 year old rott mix, though we're not sure precisely the breed as she was a rescue. Lately she's been quickly looking around up above her head, as if there was a fly there (though there's nothing in the room). This is hard to explain, but she is also kind of twitching her eyebrows up and down, one at a time, over and over.

The only change for us lately is that we've recently been working toward a change in dog food. We've been gradually decreasing the old food and bringing in the new. Right now we're at 1/2 and 1/2, and about 2 weeks into the switch. The old food was a chicken/rice/lamb meal mix. The new food is a wheat-free salmon meal and sweet potato mix (she was itchy so we thought there could possibly be a wheat allergy).

Could this be a reaction to the food switch, or could this possibly be something more involved. Thanks for your help.
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AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
Bernadine Cruz, DVM responded:
It would seem unlikely that the signs you are describing are due to a diet change. A seizure disorder is higher on my list. Seizures can be very mild and look like fly biting to what we think of more commonly...falling over, paddling with paws, vocalizing, etc.

Please make an appointment to see your primary care veterinarian to discuss your concerns. It may be necessary to run some lab tests or even refer you to a board certified veterinary neurologist. A good site where you can learn more about seizure is http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&S=0&C=0&A=560

Best of luck...
Dr. Bernadine Cruz
 
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kan718 responded:
the symptoms you mentioned are exactly what my dog did. we would laugh at first thinking he was just being silly, but low and behold he wound up having several seizures throughout the next few months. he has since been put on phenobarbital and knock on wood, has been seizure free! he just had his 6 month checkup, since the medicine can cause liver damage, and everything came back perfect! we were very relieved! i suggest going to talk to your vet... i would rather be safe than sorry and wouldn't wish what our dog went through or what we went through on anyone! hope this helps
 
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Sk8598 replied to kan718's response:
I hope you've been able to visit the vet since this was posted. I just had to put my beautiful golden retriever to sleep last weekend. She was 10 and was diagnosed with epilepsy when she was 3 years old. Her first seizure was alot like what you described,except that I also remember that she tried to walk and kept stumbling. I took her to the vet right away and they had me watch her fort he next time it happened. The second time she had a grand mal seizure and they put her on medication(potassium bromide),which controlled the seizures very well (maybe 2 a year),up until last weekend when she went into a series of cluster seizures that they couldn't stop. She was able to live a good long life while being monitored every 6 mos. at the vet. Good luck!


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