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Green Feces - Losing weight
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paulas posted:
My 13.5 year old miniature poodle (male - unaltered) has been very sick for the past 2 weeks. Started with diarrhea - extreme - then a few days later came blood with the diarrhea (quite a lot - to alarm me). Vet suspected pancreatitis. Test came back neg. He is still having spells of shivering (and it is not cold). His stools went to normal until this last night. I noticed they were getting loose again. He also went to the sidewalk and scooted his butt (he never does this). This morning his stool was completely green and not firm, but not diarrhea. I noticed it looked very strange so I put it in a zip lock bag and examined it. I found 3 pieces of small object that looks like rice kernels. Nothing was moving, but I am concerned it could be parasites. He has been on a diet of only rice and chicken over the past 9 days, but I thought all rice would digest. He also was on a medicine for a viral bacteria and finished those. Right after he finished those the Vet put him on antibiotics because during all this he broke a nail near the root. He has been on those antibiotics for 3 days now. Do you have any insight on what I should do next for him. In the past 2 weeks he has lost over 1 pound and is now down to 8.1 pounds. I am very worried. Thanks you

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Will Draper, DVM responded:
paulas: You certainly need to revisit the vet. You mentioned they tested for pancreatitis- hopefully in doing so they did a complete chemistry profile with complete blood count (CBC). I'd be interested in knowing the the liver, kidney values are like, as well as the red and white blood cell count. Also, a fecal exam (the "rice kernels" could be tapeworm parasites) and x-rays are in order for a 13 1/2 year old min poo who has lost 10% body weight in 2 weeks. The antibiotics can cause some stomach upset- but I'd be concerned there is something more going on. If your vet is hitting a road block, consider a second opinion. I wouldn't recommend waiting to see if he'll come out of it on his own. Best to you.
Dr. Will
 
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paulas replied to Will Draper, DVM's response:
Thank you so much, Dr. Draper!

After almost 3 weeks on rice and chicken he as getting thinner and more lethargic. My vet wanted me to give him pain pills and see how he does. No, she did not do a complete blood count, but she did take xrays finally. He tries to shake but stops. He has a history of back problems, so this is usual when his back hurts. I refuse to give him pain pills (along with nausea pills because the pain meds will make him sick). I started him back on his food very slowly and after three days he seems to be feeling better. I am also forcing water on him through food as he refuses to drink. My vet said "don't be concerned about him not drinking. He will get plenty through food. Give him the pain meds! And he can live on just white rice and chicken breast for a month". Well, he can't. It is not enough calories for him. YES, I will take him for a second opinion tomorrow! Thanks for caring so much.


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