Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Announcements

The Pet Health Community and Pet Health Center are NOT substitutes for a vet visit. Contact a vet in an emergency! | Dog Conditions A-Z | Dog Symptoms A-Z | Cat Conditions A-Z | Cat Symptoms A-Z

Remember Your Beloved Pet
Includes Expert Content
Eye removal in cats
avatar
dowellv posted:
My cat was unfortunately involved in a freak accident with a picture 3 days ago. The picture fell off the wall and hit her causing blood vessels in and behind her eye to rupture. The vet and I have done our best to save it, but they are now saying it looks as if the eye itself has ruptured and will have to be removed. I am really struggling with this issue. My question is, has anyone else dealt with anything like this and what's the best thing I can do to make it easier for her? Will this affect her quality of life or possibly cause a change in personality?
Reply
 
avatar
d_caitlin responded:
I can't offer great advice, as it was not my own cat who went through this, but my best friend's cat, Eddy. I grew up with him like he was my own cat. He had a very bad eye infection and the thing swelled up and bulged from his head. Her dad was a vet and performed the surgery himself to remove the eye.

Eddy, who had been an onery old guy, was actually happier afterwards, becoming more affectionate and less snappy. I think the eye had been bothering him for some time and finally having it out was a huge relief. He was able to get around like he always could, though he had some close scrapes with the wall at first. Overall, you would never guess he was a one-eyed cat! He lived a long life afterwards and was happy and better than ever. Animals adapt very well to things like this. They are quite amazing.

Good luck with your cat! I hope all goes well!!
 
avatar
AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
Drew Weigner, DVM, ABVP responded:
Actually, she'll probably feel better after surgery as her eye is most likely painful. Once the internal structures in her eye are irreparably damaged, the eye may need to be removed. However, if there's a veterinary ophthalmologist in your area (your veterinarian will know) it is worth getting a second opinion. If the eye is non-visual (meaning she can't see with that eye) she will have less depth perception, whether it is removed or not. This means it may take her a little while to get the hang of jumping from one thing to another, but she'll likely adapt. Ideally, she should not be allowed to go outside anymore.

Drew Weigner, DVM, ABVP
The Cat Doctor
Board Certified in Feline Practice
 
avatar
dowellv replied to Drew Weigner, DVM, ABVP's response:
Thanks. She has actually always been an indoor car. She had the surgery 4 days ago. The veterinary ophthalmologist works at the cat hospital that we go to, he said the eye was definitely badly ruptured. She is doing well and getting better every day. She does have some depth perception issues right now. She has walked directly into the wall at night and moves a little slow right now (partly because of the cone). I appreciate your feedback.
 
avatar
Bekah0124 replied to Drew Weigner, DVM, ABVP's response:
I have an urgent need for a second opinion related to a cat that I rescued on the 4th of July this year. Long story short, she is an old lady that developed conjunctivitis, and was severely underweight. I took her to the vet as soon as the conjunctivitis showed just a few days after finding her. The vet prescribed her some ointment, but only at the 2nd visit nearly 2 weeks in b/c the first vet said, "she didn't need anything".

Anyway, I was given (Bausch & Lomb - Neomycin and Polymyxin B Sulfates and Bacitracin Zinc) with a dosage set to 1/8th of an inch per eye, twice daily. Well, slowly but surely she was getting much better. Her eyes were remaining clear with ointment usage, and one eye which was squinted most often was finally being relaxed. I continued without fail to administer the ointment, however.

Upon visiting the vet for a followup, the vet saw that the cat seemingly gained .4lbs (yes, .4, now at 3.6lbs over the course of visits and prescription food daily), and that "she looked good", her eyes recovering nicely, a small scratch in one eye healing very nicely... the vet then made a decision to administer both a rabies vaccine and Revolution (a Flea prevention) on that visit. Before hand I questioned her judgement, asking if this was a good idea with her still low weight and also her continued antibiotic fight with the conjunctivitis. The vet said she seemed good, and she was doing good,and would administer these things I've listed. I felt uneasy but you are supposed to trust your vet.

In the same breath, the vet advised to continue the antibiotic for the eye up to 3 weeks. I found this odd after I was just told she was doing great, and well enough for these other things that would affect her immune system. She was doing very well, but only relatively speaking. She had a long way to go.

Well, after this particular visit, my little rescue went down hill. The next day, her right eye conjunctivitis came back with full vengeance. She was sleeping all the time, still an appetite (thank God) but I would have to wake her up to eat. I continued the antibiotic very precisely. The 3rd day after the vaccine visit, I finally had enough and felt this was more serious, and I called the vet. I talked with her on the phone and she said to just continue the antibiotic.

On the 5th day, I took her back to the vet. She looked at the eye and said it looked like she may lose vision in the eye, but we would have to see. She did not prescribe anything different, or additional but said to continue on the ointment.

Well, 2 days later,(the 7th day since the vaccine and Revolution) the cat's eye suddenly perforated, and absolutely freaked me out, not only b/c of the cat's behavior as a result, but the sight was gruesome. I called the vet and took her in right away. They examined it and confirmed my worst fears. It had perforated. Now, the strange thing is that the vet told me just to take her home and do nothing to the ruptured eye, that it would just die off and scar. Is this for real?? She also told me that the cat should not be experiencing pain, but prescribed me 12 pens of morphine to administer "as needed"..???

Also, she told me to stop using the antibiotic in her other eye. I don't know why I keep listening to the vet at this point, but I did stop the ointment in the remaining eye that evening. The following afternoon which is today, the eye started to show signs of the mucus discharge settling in the corner of the eye, so I called the vets office and reception told me to start the ointment again, and the vet would call me in the morning. I am awaiting her call sometime today (1:25am here now).

Is this vet out of her mind? Is the eye really supposed to be left alone to dry up and scar without any antibiotic or cleansing product to keep it from infection?

Please, I am in desperate need of competent advice. This poor cat, in my opinion, should still have both eyes and be happy and healthy on the road to recovery from her neglect.
 
avatar
Bekah0124 replied to Drew Weigner, DVM, ABVP's response:
I have an urgent need for a second opinion related to a cat that I rescued on the 4th of July this year. Long story short, she is an old lady that developed conjunctivitis, and was severely underweight. I took her to the vet as soon as the conjunctivitis showed just a few days after finding her. The vet prescribed her some ointment, but only at the 2nd visit nearly 2 weeks in b/c the first vet said, "she didn't need anything".

Anyway, I was given (Bausch & Lomb - Neomycin and Polymyxin B Sulfates and Bacitracin Zinc) with a dosage set to 1/8th of an inch per eye, twice daily. Well, slowly but surely she was getting much better. Her eyes were remaining clear with ointment usage, and one eye which was squinted most often was finally being relaxed. I continued without fail to administer the ointment, however.

Upon visiting the vet for a followup, the vet saw that the cat seemingly gained .4lbs (yes, .4, now at 3.6lbs over the course of visits and prescription food daily), and that "she looked good", her eyes recovering nicely, a small scratch in one eye healing very nicely... the vet then made a decision to administer both a rabies vaccine and Revolution (a Flea prevention) on that visit. Before hand I questioned her judgement, asking if this was a good idea with her still low weight and also her continued antibiotic fight with the conjunctivitis. The vet said she seemed good, and she was doing good,and would administer these things I've listed. I felt uneasy but you are supposed to trust your vet.

In the same breath, the vet advised to continue the antibiotic for the eye up to 3 weeks. I found this odd after I was just told she was doing great, and well enough for these other things that would affect her immune system. She was doing very well, but only relatively speaking. She had a long way to go.

Well, after this particular visit, my little rescue went down hill. The next day, her right eye conjunctivitis came back with full vengeance. She was sleeping all the time, still an appetite (thank God) but I would have to wake her up to eat. I continued the antibiotic very precisely. The 3rd day after the vaccine visit, I finally had enough and felt this was more serious, and I called the vet. I talked with her on the phone and she said to just continue the antibiotic.

On the 5th day, I took her back to the vet. She looked at the eye and said it looked like she may lose vision in the eye, but we would have to see. She did not prescribe anything different, or additional but said to continue on the ointment.

Well, 2 days later,(the 7th day since the vaccine and Revolution) the cat's eye suddenly perforated, and absolutely freaked me out, not only b/c of the cat's behavior as a result, but the sight was gruesome. I called the vet and took her in right away. They examined it and confirmed my worst fears. It had perforated. Now, the strange thing is that the vet told me just to take her home and do nothing to the ruptured eye, that it would just die off and scar. Is this for real?? She also told me that the cat should not be experiencing pain, but prescribed me 12 pens of morphine to administer "as needed"..???

Also, she told me to stop using the antibiotic in her other eye. I don't know why I keep listening to the vet at this point, but I did stop the ointment in the remaining eye that evening. The following afternoon which is today, the eye started to show signs of the mucus discharge settling in the corner of the eye, so I called the vets office and reception told me to start the ointment again, and the vet would call me in the morning. I am awaiting her call sometime today (1:25am here now).

Is this vet out of her mind? Is the eye really supposed to be left alone to dry up and scar without any antibiotic or cleansing product to keep it from infection?

Please, I am in desperate need of competent advice. This poor cat, in my opinion, should still have both eyes and be happy and healthy on the road to recovery from her neglect.
 
avatar
rohvannyn replied to Bekah0124's response:
Wow... it sounds like there is something wrong here and I would advise to get a new vet if at all possible, or at least talk to another vet about the actions of the first vet. Perhaps the vet thought that letting the eye dry up on its own would leave less avenue for infection? I would agree, removal seems like a better idea too but then again I'm haven't seen the results of all the test and don't know the vet's thought process. Hope your kitty feels better!
 
avatar
Bekah0124 replied to rohvannyn's response:
Thank you for your response. The only reason I can see for not pushing to have a surgical removal is that she is still quite tiny. However, you think this would have all been thought of far in advance, before vaccines and flea meds. I don't know why the vet was so eager to deem her to be well enough for those things... Does that make sense? If she would be too frail for complications to arise and be handled most properly, why would you intentionally set up the possibility that complications may occur.
 
avatar
Bekah0124 replied to rohvannyn's response:
I apologize for the double responses, I keep getting a posting error with WebMD, letting me know that my post was not successful, but after retyping and submitting, the previous post also appears. Very sorry.
 
avatar
rohvannyn replied to Bekah0124's response:
No worries, WebMd does that sometimes. I totally understand. I'm still scratching my head at your vet's decisions here. I can really only think of three possibilities: incomplete thinking, desire for profit, or some unexpected factor in the case.
 
avatar
jvteacher responded:
I wonder if The Cat Doctor can advise me quickly too? My 13 1/2 year old cat, Freddie, was attacked by a tomcat when he was a kitten, living outside, before I took him. I immediately took him to the vet, who removed a cat's claw from his eye. I took him home and he's been my little boy ever since. Occasionally his eye would act up, but it always got better. This last time, he was leaking eye fluid and literally dying. I rushed him to my vet, who gave me ointment which didn't work, and about 10 days later vet performed emergency surgery involving "bringing up" the 3rd eyelid, as Freddie had 2 corneal ulcers and his eye was collapsing. I took him home the next day and he's been on drops and antibiotics for almost 3 weeks now, with tri-weekly follow-ups with vet. Freddie's little "sister", Roxy instinctively knows not to lick the bad eye, and they adore each other. Tomorrow, I have to take Freddie for unstitching under anesthesia. Vet says he won't know if the corneal ulcers healed until he drops the 3rd lid back down, and he may have to bring the lid back up again!. A vet tech from another vet's office told me the eye should have been removed immediately. I wouldn't have permitted it, and would've had Freddie put to sleep permanently to save him from such pain. But now I'm considering it. If the ulcers aren't healed tomorrow, I'm not consenting to another 3rd lid surgery. He has suffered enough. Can you give me a professional opinion as to whether I should have his eye removed or let him go painlessly, while still under anesthesia? I am staying at the vet's office pre surgery no matter how long we have to wait. I won't simply leave him there as instructed, and have already told that to my vet. Can you tell me how much pain would be involved for Freddie after having an eye removed? I will put him down first before subjecting him to more agony. Please advise me. Thank you.


Featuring Experts from AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

Bernadine D. Cruz, DVM, is an associate veterinarian at Laguna Hills Animal Hospital, Laguna Hills, Calif. She specializes in companion animal medicin...More

Helpful Tips

to: Msapprehension
dogs eat their poop by nature. before dogs were "pets" they were wild and ran in packs. they ate their poop everyday for two reasons: 1 - ... More
Was this Helpful?
1 of 2 found this helpful

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Learn more about the AVMA

WebMD Special Sections