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Dog Acting Odd
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An_250243 posted:
This evening when I got home from work my dog (a mastiff - Olde English bulldog mix named Dukie) was acting really strange. He is prancing. There are no signs of any ingested toxins, the garbage is not dug out and nothing has been moved. My fiance was here earlier today and they played for a while. When I got home from work a little after 7, my fiance said he was downstairs laying in the bathroom. He usually greets me and is literally all over me when I get home from being away - especially when I am away for this many hours. I hadn't been home since yesterday around 715am. He won't go up and down steps - my fiance carried him up from downstairs and that's not usual for him -usually you can't carry him anywhere. I called the vet and they asked the questions about toxins, but there isn't anything I can think that he has gotten into. He doesn't yip when he walks or anything, but he isn't acting like himself either. He has just started wagging his stub when I talk to him. He won't step through the doorway to go outside or inside the house and he is walking slowly occasionally running into things. Now he isn't the most graceful dog on a normal day, but this is really weird for him. This is the first right now that I have heard him do any type of vocalizing - he whimpered a little bit to have a bite of my fiance's egg sandwich. He usually is very verbal and barks at a lot. He is 4 and will be 5 years old in April.
The only thing the vet could suggest would be some activated charcoal and benadryl. Is there something I am overlooking?
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