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I think she id depressed
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Arvetta posted:
Hello, I have two older cats and a new 6 month old maltese puppy. Around 2 months after I brought home the pupies my cats started to retreat to themselves. They stoppped eating, lethargic, hide, and stopped running and playing. I started separating the cats and the dog and one got better, however the other is still the same. Sheehas lost weight from not eating, and walks slowly and barely meow's. I think she is in deppression because of the new animal. do you have any suggestion on how to snap a cat out of depression.
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rohvannyn responded:
That can be really hard to deal with. Some cats take forever to adjust to a new member of the household. Here are some tips that can help.

Always make sure the cats have a safe place to be away from the puppy. Also make sure they can get to food, water, and litterbox without interference.

Train the puppy not to bother the cats. At 6 months you can start training the puppy at least a little.

Make sure you give the cats plenty of quality time. Spend time petting them, talking to them, and letting them know that they are very much loved. Play with them if they will allow it. Try to maintain some routine for them, they thrive on that.

If they tolerate it, give the cats catnip. It may help them forget their troubles.

Cats don't snap out of anything until they are ready. Have patience and keep encouraging your depressed cat. As the puppy settles down, and starts smelling like the cats' surroundings, hopeully there will be more peace in your home.
 
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AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
Drew Weigner, DVM, ABVP responded:
Although it's possible, it's not likely your cat is still depressed after this length of time. She may have developed one of many geriatric diseases of cats such as kidney disease, diabetes, thyroid disease, etc. Please make an appointment for her at your veterinarian as soon as possible.

Drew Weigner, DVM, ABVP
The Cat Doctor
Board Certified in Feline Practice


Featuring Experts from AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

William Draper, DVM, better known as "Dr. Will," is a well-known small animal practitioner in the Atlanta, GA area. He grew up in Inglewood,...More

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