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Paranoid behavior
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An_254291 posted:
I have an 8 y/o German Short.hr.Poiinter..Since as a puppy, stays in a 8 x 12 ft house ( heated/ air cond/radio/company with a10y/0 GSP) during the day while we are at work. Has a concrete dog run to come hang out on when he wants during the day..All was well until, in august this year, ate through his galvanized 6 ft pen, tore wtith his teeth and nails to escape..nearly killed self on numerous occasions to get out. Thought it was due to new found woodchucks under his house..then kept him inside my home for next two months..brought him out again to his house (woodchucks gone)... Daily signs of him trying to escape. Cage wires are bent. Yesterday, came home from work, bloody feet, ears, again trying to escape..he is fine outside his coup..today I put him inside his house..he went in...sat in corner..shaking and looking all around like he sees something, paranoid,scared..can't figure it out..he also fears flies and bugs which not present inside his house...don't know what to do..it is not boredom..he is fightened..not sure why..he absolutely can't stay inside our home when we r at work...we feel safer in case of fire or breaking...he is totally fine outside the haven we built..beautiful spot...any ideas what to do?
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AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
Bernadine Cruz, DVM responded:
What a perplexing situation. Would have to wonder if something happened while he was in the run that severely frightened him and now he relates that terror to the run. I would first be sure that there are no covert medical conditions that may be contributing to the situation...take him to your veterinarian for a thorough physical exam and possibly some blood and urine testing. If the results are normal, you could try mounting a video recording device outside the run to monitor what sets him off, how soon it occurs after his is placed in the run and the interaction with the other dog. He may need some calming medications and/or a consult with a board certified veterinary behaviorist. I hope this helps. I would recommend that you seek professional attention soon before this poor boy hurts himself further.
 
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hencha replied to Bernadine Cruz, DVM's response:
Thank you so much..in regards to the other dog, they are pals. Moe however is 13 years old and just sleeps all day, and lost his hearing..calming meds unfortunately don't work for long hours..I may have to video tape situation..although, I pretended to go to work, put him in his coup, and he just starts to pull at the front of the coop with his teeth and doesn't quit..there is absolutely nothing getting in his house..He was at vets last week for a hematoma on his year induced by trauma, attempting to get out, once again..so I don't think this is a medical issue. Will the vet behaviorist be able to tell if this is a psychosis ?
 
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hencha replied to hencha's response:
Also, my husband is saying, the dog will need to learn !... He keeps putting the dog back in his house and now wants to get a small zapper. When he sees the dog starting to pull at fencing/wire, he wants to zap him, for negative re-I forcemeat..I think that is nuts..


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