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Altered cats and loose abdominal skin
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pennie61 posted:
Can anyone tell me why cats develop loose skin on their abdomen after they are neutered? I have noticed this in both male and female cats regardless of whether or not they are overweight. I can understand this in a female cat because essentially she has a full hysterectomy and her abdominal muscle is excised, but do not understand this in a male cat.
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AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
Drew Weigner, DVM, ABVP responded:
Cats lose elasticity in their skin as they age, just as people do. This is the main cause of the loose skin you describe. Another factor is the loss of sex hormones (estrogen or testosterone) after neutering, but this is believed to be a minor factor. Fortunately, this doesn't hurt them and causes no symptoms. Incidentally, although the fibrous tissue between the abdominal muscles is cut when neutering a female cat, the muscles themselves are not usually cut and are not removed during this surgery, so this doesn't cause their skin to sag![br> [br>
Drew Weigner, DVM, ABVP
The Cat Doctor
Board Certified in Feline Practice


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