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    Cat - severe mouth problems
    avatar
    solun posted:
    Dear WebMD community,


    I was wondering if anyone could help diagnose this condition.

    Three years ago, our not even 1 year old cat was healthy - beautiful, playful, nothing seemed wrong. Then she gave birth to 4 kittens (one of them stuck in her and had to be removed manually by veterinarian).

    After some time, bottom part of her mouth started to change visually — very slowly but steadily over the period of two years and it probably still changes. Since the birth she also had something like a running nose. We took her to a vet — he couldn't identify what was going on but suggested that he could (literally) open her skull and clean some parts of her nasal cavity. He didn't know if that would help both problems and said she might not survive the procedure. We refused to do that.

    She is not playful or beautiful anymore - cannot lick properly so her fur has to be taken care of from our side which is often not possible. She has problems with eating (we have to arrange her food so she can swallow it, she doesn't really bite it).


    The closest vet is 20 miles, the cat is not managing the transport well, so I'd like to spare her of too many journeys.


    HER PROBLEMS: unability to chew properly, bad breath, she lost one tooth due to mouth deformation.


    Pictures included under the text. Please be advised that some of you may find the pictures disturbing and graphic like I do. But I want to help her. Does she have cancer or could it be some rare disease? Should I find a new veterinarian?


    2010:






    2011:





    2014 (she has running nose, it is not cleaned on this picture, the main problem remains the mouth):




    Reply
     
    avatar
    AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
    Drew Weigner, DVM, ABVP responded:
    There are many possibilities for these symptoms, including cancer, stomatitis (inflammation of the mouth for unknown causes), viral infections, etc. Since this is getting very severe, she really needs to be seen for a diagnosis. This may require blood tests and/or biopsies but, at this point, it is affecting her quality of life. If your veterinarian isn't comfortable with this case, ask if he can refer you to a board certified feline or internal medicine specialist as soon as possible. In the meantime, antibiotics may improve her symptoms somewhat, but are unlikely to solve her problem.

    Drew Weigner, DVM, ABVP
    The Cat Doctor
    Board Certified in Feline Practice


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