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    my dog doesn't feel good
    avatar
    neeyah posted:
    My dog is a female and she is not due to go in heat for another 3 months, but her nipples are sagging and very warm in temperature. She is not her usual peppy self. She has been like this since Sunday. But she still has a appetite and is going to the bathroom normal.
    Reply
     
    avatar
    AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
    Bonnie Beaver, BS, DVM, MS responded:
    If your dog isn't feeling well for a few days or is getting worse, I would recommend that you have your veterinarian evaluate her to be sure the condition isn't a major problem. I say this because of the timing relative to when she is due to come into heat again. Since the time you expect her next heat is 3 months, that suggests to me that she was in heat about 3 months ago. That puts her reproductive cycle near the end of a pseudopregnancy.

    Dogs are different that most other animals in their reproductive cycles. When a dog ovulates during heat, the area of the ovary forms a structure called a corpus luteum or CL. The CL secretes hormones that maintain pregnancy for about 63 days. (In most other animals, the CL stops functions shortly after it forms and pregnancy is maintained by the presence of the fetus.) The long presence of the CL in the dog means that hormonally the female experiences all the changes of pregnancy even if no puppies are present (we call the condition without puppies a false pregnancy or pseudopregnancy). At the time when the CL starts to shrink, puppies would be born, the mammary region would enlarge, milk would be produced, and maternal behavior would start. If no puppies are born, the female can still show one or more of the other signs.

    Typically the signs of pseudopregnancy will get worse each time the intact female goes through a false pregnancy. In additon she is susceptable to pyometra (an infection of the uterus that can be life threatening), mastitis (an infection of the mammary glands), and mammary cancer. This is why most veterinarians recommend that females that are not going to be used for breeding be spayed.
     
    avatar
    pamspups replied to Bonnie Beaver, BS, DVM, MS's response:
    My 2 year old mix breed has been acting more aggressive the last 2 days, growling at the other dogs and me, this is not her usual. She has been hiding under blanket, very clingy, and feels warm but, nose is wet, doesn't seem to be in pain. Could this be her starting her cycle?
     
    avatar
    AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
    Bonnie Beaver, BS, DVM, MS replied to pamspups's response:
    This is probably not the start of her heat cycle. The aggression is probably because she is not feeling well. Please see your veterinarian.


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