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    Pregnancy and Soy
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    cleoking1305 posted:
    Tomorrow I will be entering my second trimester and I have a little worry about soy products and my pregnancy. I've heard things from family and the internet that if a woman consumes more than two servings a day of soy products, she can ultimately change the sex of the baby to a girl! Also, I've heard that more than 2 servings of soy can trigger an abnormal uterine environment for the fetus. I know too much of anything can have side effects, but what is the real deal with soy and pregnancy? I consume about a cup a day with my cereal by the way.
    Reply
     
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    tru03 responded:
    This doesn't go with your post. But was it you that said you new you were pregnant the first week or a couple of days? If so i was just curious about the feelings or how you knew...Or the test said it was positive so quickly.... im hoping to be prego but having doubts at the moment.... please let me know. Thanks
     
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    ambervalero responded:
    First, you cannot change the sex of your baby after the fact. Nothing can. The sex of your child is determined as soon as you conceive. Second, I have no viable proof of this but I don't think soy would have a negative effect on your uterine environment. There are numerous women that eat soy and other health food daily through out their pregnancies and have healthy children. Just like everything else I would have to say, discuss your concerns with your doctor. They can help you more than anyone here. :) Good Luck!
     
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    Jennax907 responded:
    I have a dairy allergy and consume copious amounts of soy products. Needless to say, I have a healthy son and a healthy baby girl on the way. A cup of soy milk a day is not going to adversly affect your pregnancy.
     
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    lady_samwise responded:
    Soy won't change your babies sex, that is determined the moment conception happens and is not variable. Soy is good for your body during pregnancy so do not worry, if you have a girl it was going to be a girl anyway, and you still have a 50% chance of having a boy.
     
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    cleoking1305 replied to lady_samwise's response:
    Thanks everyone. I love soy products and the last thing I need to see and hear are adverse affects on pregnancy. Thanks again and keep the comments coming.
     
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    cleoking1305 replied to tru03's response:
    Well, I am usually very in tune with my body because I practice yoga and I meditate. I just felt like something was taking over my body. I couldn't concentrate on anything, the sides of my hips hurt when I woke up in the morning, and I felt dizzy a lot. In general I just wasn't myself and I just knew I had to be pregnant. I hope this helps!


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