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Incontinence Cuff Surgery Questions
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oldcountry12 posted:
Has anyone had the surgery to put in a 'cuff' to stop urinary incontinence after prostate surgery? My surgery was about 10 yrs ago, but due to post-op complications, did not secure my continence. I put off any additional surgery at that time, but am now interested in getting this cuff put on. What I'd like to hear about is anyone's personal experience with this 'cuff' surgery and how they've lived with it. Specifically, how difficult/awkward is it to work; can you work it through the fly of your pants or do you have to drop your pants to work the pump; do you feel any pressure when the cuff is closed; and did it completely clear up incontinence or just partially? Any replies would be appreciated. Thanks.
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sitzooey101 responded:
Yes! I would say get it done. It cut my leakage by about 90%. You could go ahead and use your fly if it suits you, but getting in to work the pump is a problem, but it can be done. Standing and letting one's pants hang half way off is OK only if you are sure you are not going to drip and stain. I have never felt any pressure when the cuff is closed. All in all, it changed my life for the better by far.
 
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Basir U Tareen, MD responded:
I can't speak from a patient's perspective, but from a surgeon's perspective patient's who get the artificial sphincter are amongst the most satisfied and happy patients we see.


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