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Agent Orange and prostate cancer.
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morti2 posted:
I go to the VA for prostate biopsey this month. I was exposed to Agent Orange in vietnam while serving in the US Army. I understand a number of veterans like myself have ended up with prostate cancer? What type of cancer? Anyone know? And what treatment? Thanks.
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TomS1948 responded:
Yes, there are many of us Vietnam vets that have (had) PC and receive VA compensation. IF you are diagnosed with PC, then you file your claim with the VA. I was already in their system from having taken a VA physical when I retired from the military and it only took about 30-45 days to get benefits. Another guy in my office, also a Vietnam Vet with PC, took over 6 months to get his benefits. Since the VA is doing the biopsy, maybe that will speed things along "IF" you are diagnosed with PC. For more information go to:
http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/diseases.asp
 
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morti2 replied to TomS1948's response:
Thanks.
 
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Larryj305 replied to TomS1948's response:
I am a retired auto worker and my benefits didn't cover office calls so I started going to the VA and they found the PC in a biopsy. I was in Viet Nam but don't know if I came in contact with agent orange but it doesn't make any difference as long as u were in country u get benefits. I went outside of VA for treatment as my hosipital didn't do Brachytherapy and would have had to go to Albany. I got my urologist and oncology radiolagist to prepare statements and it took a couple of months after diagnosis to get benefits and they will then rate ur disability and that deternines how much u get and how much u pay at the VA. By Having Brachytherapy outside the VA I had quite a few Co-Pays to come up with.
I don't have my papers in front of me but if u r really interested I will look it up. I think a lot of Dr's are salesmen and depending what kind of proceedures they do will depend what they will tell u to do as long as ur Gleason score is not to HIGH. That is only my opinion.
 
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DUKE MEDICINE
Judd W Moul, MD responded:
The vast majority of prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas. All of these prostate cancers are considered related to agent orange exposure from Vietnam service. If you are diagnosed with prostate cancer, your VA will be very well equipped to discuss this further with you as this is a common situation and the VA coverage has been in place since the Clinton administration.

Best of luck to you. I am also a veteran, having served 26 years in the US Army and being eligible for health care in the VA health care system.

Dr. Moul
 
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morti2 replied to Judd W Moul, MD's response:
Thanks. The biopsey is Tuesday. Do I really need someone to drive me home?
 
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carolinec61 responded:
My husband 63 years, was exposed to agent orange also,
he had cancer 30 years ago and now had stage 4 prostate cancer. Three years ago we found out, and it had been a rocky road since then. It has spread to his bones, and is going for a new chemo this week. We are in the process of applying for VA benefits. The VA will not reject. Good luck to you.......
 
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carolinec61 replied to Judd W Moul, MD's response:
Dr. I am glad I found this site. My husband 63 yrs. had his second bout with cancer, 40 years ago with testicular and now stage 4 prostate cancer, all from agent orange. Do you know anything about the new chemo drug called jujuvana (not sure of the spelling). Its given every 3 weeks. He was not responmding any more to taxatere. His PSA is 360. We both would like a ray of hope.Were in the process of applying to VA benefits. Id like to know more about the new chemo drug. Can you help me.? THANKS...
 
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DUKE MEDICINE
Judd W Moul, MD replied to carolinec61's response:
Cabazitaxel (Jevtana) was recently FDA-approved as the first systemic chemotherapy proven to extend survival after a patient has stopped responding to docetaxel (Taxotere). For more information, visit the Jevtana website at http://www.jevtana.com .
 
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5150cop responded:
I have been seeing urologists since 2004 when my prostrate cancer showed. I was in SEA (Vietnam) 1966-1975, USAF, although we spent several days on the ground (required to have a VA claim approved). I had a cryotherapy procedure in the fall of 2004 and now am taking homone treatments to keep my PSA below 1. The cryo procedure is less invasive and saves your prostrate for awhile. I am only 1 of the many patients that had cryo therapy in OKC and most are successful in keeping the psa down. However; in my case, apparently the cancer is hidden behind the areas where biopsies can go? I had a 2nd indepth biopsy wherein I was put to sleep and the doc took 80 samples that were all benign. However; since the psa had risen to 10, my urologist convinced me to start hormoe therapy. My first encounter with cancer was 1970 (only 4 years after my first trip to Vietnam) and I had my spit gland removed from my riight throat area for a malignant carcinoma of the submaxillary gland.
 
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5150cop responded:
By the way; it took me 39 years to get the VA to acknowledge that I was a "Veteran" since my flights into SEA were as a reservist-!!!
 
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fwhast replied to Judd W Moul, MD's response:
Dr. Moul,
Do have any info on the new genetic testing ( oncotype dx test) that gives better info regarding aggressive prostate cancer vs less aggressive cancer. These test are new and expensive but they may allow some to forgo treatment and employ watchful waiting with more confidence.Can these test be done in the VA medical system?
Thanks
fwhast


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