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What EVERY newly diagnosed Prostate Cancer (PCa) patient needs to know!
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az4peaks2 posted:

What EVERY newly diagnosed Prostate Cancer (PCa) patient needs to know! by John E. Holliday, FACMPE


First, ALL Prostate Cancer patients should determine the basic diagnostic realities of their specific disease and understand its relative significance. In my opinion, EVERY newly diagnosed PCa patient needs to gather the following data, to even START your considerations.



I would suggest you begin by acquiring the following diagnostic results.


(1) What was my last PSA prior to diagnosis? (If available, previous PSA readings with dates are helpful). Either get copies or write them down.


(2) What is my complete Gleason SCORE? (Primary + Secondary GRADES = Gleason SCORE) ie: (3+3)= 6, (4+3)= 7, etc.


(3) What is the clinical STAGE assigned to my Prostate Cancer? (ie: T1c, T2a, T3b, etc.)


(4) Obtain a copy of the Pathology Report from the Biopsy, which should be available from your Physician. It can contain helpful information, now and in the future. Keep it for your records!


These 4 items, when coupled with your age and ethnicity, will provide the BASIC information necessary to BEGIN to truly understand what the status of your disease is thought to be, at the time of your diagnosis. When embarking on any journey, when trying to determine the route you want to take, you must first determine where you are NOW, and this is that START! Without knowing this basic information, and understanding its relevance, informed decisions cannot be made and the applicable relevance of gathered information remains undetermined.


If a man has been diagnosed with early stage disease, as approximately 3 out of 4 men presenting today are, there is usually no urgent reason or necessity, to make a hurried, uninformed decision. If you feel rushed, pressured or remain uncertain as to whether you know enough to feel relatively comfortable with your choice, wait until you are.


Obviously, however, there is no reason to unnecessarily prolong the decision making process beyond that reasonable time frame needed to acquire, and to understand, such information. Delays should NOT be the result of unwarranted procrastination.


With this basic information, the educational learning process can begin and more INFORMED decisions are then possible.

I will be happy to answer specific questions that anyone may have. - John@newPCa.org (aka) az4peaks
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