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hearing the laughter suffering alone
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dem17 posted:
In the wake of the death of Robin Williams. this should be a loud wake up about mental illness, there needs to talks , so that there will be no more stories like this, he was loved by so many
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dfromspencer responded:
I cried last night when i heard this horrible news! Robin Williams was my favorite funny man EVER!!! He was one that made me laugh so hard, my sides and stomach hurt!

There will never be another like him!!!

I know what he was going through, i tried to off myself over depression three times. He got it right the first time! I got help, and it works for me. Depression needs to be labelled something else, DEPRESSION comes with a stigma! You might as well hang a big sign around your neck proclaiming your DEPRESSION.

Depression should be labelled like any other bodily disease such a liver disease, or heart disease, not as anything separate from that?! Depression is an ILLNESS, nothing more!!! This stigma needs to be erased from our conscience!

DEPRESSION is a DISEASE like any other, lets make it so!!!

Robin, i'm sorry for the Shozbot last night! I just want to say Nanu Nanu to you for the last time. You, my long time friend, will be sorely missed!!!!!!!!!!!

I, I can't say it, all i can do is say "See you later, my friend"!

D.

P.S. Thank you Debbie, for bringing this up!
LIVE LONG, LOVE WELL!!!
 
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dem17 replied to dfromspencer's response:
I think some good come from the loss of a good friend, i think there should be many conversations until there is an understanding, there are times i felt like crying but i chose to sound the word as away to cope. not taking away away from anyone else, i sat and watched mork and mindy with my son. he was so funny
 
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rohvannyn responded:
Thanks for mentioning this, Deb. I agree that this is a good opportunity for a conversation about mental illness, what it means, how we can support people who suffer, and more.

I also hear what Dennis says about how depression can be stigmatizing to people. I've never noticed this with myself, but I have noticed that many people don't take depression seriously. Much of the public seems to think it is just sadness you can get over with enough willpower. They don't get that it can be a chemical imbalence (which for me is partially situational and partly nutrient affected) that may need medication to treat. It's kind of like diabetes. You may have type 1 diabetes and require medication no matter what. You may have early type 2, which can be corrected and even reversed with diet. You may have serious type 2 which needs attention to the diet as well as medication. Substitute "diabetes" with "depression" and "diet" with "therapy" and you really have the situation. But much of the public doesn't treat it that way.

But back to Mr. Williams. Once I found out more about his situation I had real compassion for him. Like many of our brightest and most talented, he had a lot to deal with. Great sensitivity, manic phases, trouble with depression, as well as a recent divorce, a fight with substance abuse, a TV show of his that was canceled for the new season, and much more. I think he hit that point where the last straw fell onto his already overburdened back, and it was just too much. I've nearly been there myself. At that moment it can be impossible to see hope even if it exists. Now that I know a little more about him I mourn his passing and I wish him peace.
Roh

'Your focus determines your reality.' --QGJ
 
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Leslie Becker-Phelps, PhD replied to dem17's response:
He was a true comic genius, as well as having incredible acting talent in more serious roles. It made me truly sad to hear about his death and about how his depression overcame him. I, along with you and so many others, mourn his loss.

Deb: Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts about the death of Robin Williams and for opening up the topic for others to share their thoughts and feelings, too. Such sharing can help people feel part of a larger community and it can be healing.
 
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dem17 replied to Leslie Becker-Phelps, PhD's response:
It is really sad to think of how much pain he was in, I was watching shoe last night. they said that he had so many problems since his relapse, the one i have is if he was so f depressed why was he not put in the hospital? where they waiting to see if i it would pass, like everyone thinks about depression,this topic needs to stay in the f for front, but always it does fade when the headlines do. this needs to be kept in the light, and you a;; are welcome, i wish webmd would find way that other people could join in
 
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rohvannyn replied to dem17's response:
We have a depression community here on WebMd, maybe I'll start a thread in his honor to start some conversations. Sometimes I think people don't realy know how depressed others are beacuse they hide it or it's downplayed, and that might have been the case with Mr. Williams. He'd actually sought some help recently with his substance problems, going back into rehab for a bit as a "tune up" but not because of a relapse. I wish he'd had better support as well.
Roh

'Your focus determines your reality.' --QGJ
 
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dem17 replied to rohvannyn's response:
it bothers me, that just because you see it does not mean that people are not suffering m if a person takes their life, then they are taking the cowards way out, they dont how much this is so overwhelming. if you do start one there , i will look in on the depression board , it seems that webmd has picked on his story
 
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dfromspencer replied to dem17's response:
Hi Deb,

I don't think its taking the "cowards way out", when i did try, i felt it was the only way to solve my pain problem i couldn't get rid of! I had asked for help, and the doctors that tried to help, knew it wasn't working. And, when life was too heavy, filled with much too much sorrow, i tried the only method left. That's all, no thinking about cowardice or anything else, just relief?! When you get desperate enough to stop the pain and agony you have inside your brain where no one else can touch, no, it is definately NOT the cowards way out, at least i don't think so?

Anyone else had that feeling? The one inside your brain where no one, nor anything they try helps? You get a desperateness beyond compare to any pain you might otherwise feel?! I was lucky as hell to find a doctor that didn't give up till she found something that helped.

Has anyone here tried Paxill? This was my life saver! I had tried all the others, none of them reached the right spot. I felt my whole life change not even one full week into this trial!!! Finally, someone had finally found one tiny pill that helped me right my uneven keel. I could not even remember ever feeling so good, so right with the world?!

I finally beat that demon who ruled my aching brain! Now, i can use wellbutrin, and feel the same effect! I thank all the powers that be, for finding the tiny pill called Paxill, without it, i would not be here, or at least not be me?!

Thank you, Debbie! For bringing this topic out into the wide open, so everyone can see how desperate many can be when depression goes uncontrolled?!

Robin, I wish you peace!

Dennis
LIVE LONG, LOVE WELL!!!


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