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    I've never had feeling during sex and I don't know where to turn to anymore.
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    An_244250 posted:
    I started having sex when I was 17. I'm 22 now and have had 2 partners. I've always had protected sex, been tested for STD/STI's, everything. Nothing's helped and everyone thinks I'm crazy! For me, when he first enters I feel a tremendous pressure against my body than that's it. I thought maybe it was a size thing, but I've tried various size toys and I can't even tell if they're in or not because I can't feel them. The feeling I have from sex is the feeling of him laying on top of me or in whatever position we're in. I've tried everything, toys, videos, new positions and nothing changes. I don't even "need" sex. Between partners, I went 4 years and didn't even realize it until my most recent partner asked when I had sex last and I had to think about it. I can't have a relationship because I don't know how to tell a 20 something year old guy that no matter how much effort he puts into it, I can't enjoy something I don't feel. I've tried talking to 3 doctors and they just look at me like I'm insane. Please let there be someone out there that knows what is going on or at least who to turn to! I don't want to spend the rest of my life wondering why my friends love being with their partners when I can't even feel them.
    Reply
     
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    tlkittycat1968 responded:
    You're normal. The majority of women don't feel much other than pressure during sex. Only the outer third of the vagina has nerves so once you get past that, there really isn't anything.

    If you're expecting to orgasm during sex, be aware that up to 70% (or more ) of women are unable to orgasm during sex and need some sort of clitoral stimulation to orgasm.
     
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    jsmith responded:
    I know exactly what you are talking about, you cannot feel him inside of you like you used to. Maybe you could or couldn't orgasm when he was in you, but you felt him in you. I had a D &C and an ablation, after those procedures I couldn't feel my lover inside me either (have you had a surgical procedure?), I felt him when he penetrated me, but after that nothing. No pressure, no sensation of movement, nothing, like your canal was void of feeling....it is quite dewomaninzing.....i am very sorry.......I do not have an explanation.....everyone has looked at me like I was crazy...and I am sorry.....I do not have an answer as I also have herpes and have not enjoyed intercourse for some time.....but you are NOT ALONE.
     
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    elle0317 replied to jsmith's response:
    Try Kegel exercises, they can help tighten the vaginal muscles and improve sensations/orgasms.


    Helpful Tips

    Difficulty having an orgasm?Expert
    Try reading Becoming Orgasmic: A Sexual and Personal Growth Program for Women by Julia Heiman , Joseph Ph.D. LoPiccolo and David ... More
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