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How human touch affects a relationship
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timetotell posted:
So many people ask what makes people want other people sexually. For instance you have an attraction of course. Than you talk and maybe have a connection of things in common. Than you both open up to each other about something and commonality develops. But nothing really registers until you touch and I'm not talking about hugs or kisses. I'm talking about the way that person exchanges visually with you and how comfortable it is when they touch you. So you meet this guy/gal and they have maybe four or five moves suddenly things heat up. OK so the sex thing goes on the table. But do people really know how to touch each other really. I have been a Massage Therapist for 17+ years and have over 40 different types or styles of massage and in all those years and clients no one has ever said you touch me like my husband or girl friend. This stuff can be taught to couples. You just have to care enough to learn.
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MartinRedford responded:
I would say that touching is one of the most underrated of our 5 senses, and yet it seems that it's importance in our everyday lives is incredulous. I have written an article to enhance the value of this post. The Science and Psychology Behind Touch:http://www.theperfectmaleblog.com/2011/01/top-10-things-women-find-attractive-in.html
 
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cheesedips69 replied to MartinRedford's response:
very important...i get little so i know


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