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Wierd smell behind my ears
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aberrob posted:
Hi everyone, I'm new here. I've been looking for help with this but haven't been able to find anything yet.

I'm a long time sufferer of dandruff. Also, over the past couple years, I've been getting itchy, flaky skin on my face, which I think from researching online is related to a tinea fungus. I get it mainly on my eyebrows and when i have facial hair. Lately, after a lot of sweating (sometimes no sweating required) I get a weird smell and occasional itching behind my ears. If I wipe behind my ears and smell it, it's not pleasant Sometimes I can even smell it without touching the area. It's embarrassing and I would like to do something about it. I consider myself a very clean person, I shower at least once a day and wash my hair with head & shoulders daily. I've also used Nizoral AD. While Nizoral AD worked well for dandruff and better for the flaking on my face, it seemed to actually make the smell behind my ears worse. Any help with this would be greatly appreciated.
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Sparky23456 responded:
Dear aberrob: The odor behind your ears is due to oil-producing glands that we all have. This, in and of itself, is capable of producing an odor. Sometimes bacteria joins in the mix, and the odor may become quite unpleasant. This is why it's never advisable to rub perfume or cologne behind one's ears (even though we see it done time and again in the movies and and on tv). The oils and bacteria behind your ears can change the chemistry of the perfume...and NOT for the better. I would suggest that you carry pre-moistened wipes with you so that you can wipe behind your ears more frequently during the day. If that's not sufficient, try a little rubbing alcohol to keep the oil and bacteria levels down. Hope this helps. May God bless.
 
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GJRuss responded:
You may want to go to the dermatologist. For years I have been treated for tinea corporis (ring worm) diagnosed by my family physician, but after I started getting bad patches on my leg that would not go away with treatment (after over a month) and then it got into my scalp, behind my ear and the last straw, my eyelid. I went to a dermotogist to find out I have psoriasis, not ringworm and they started me on meds totally different from what I used for RW. This has cleared my scalp and face and the bad patch is now getting better in only a week's time. You sound like you may have this as well. Wouldn't hurt to go get it checked out and after all the drandriff shampoos and Lamasil I've bought in the past years; the expensive for an office visit is minor.
 
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susiemargaret responded:
hello --

in addition to a visit to the dermatologist, i would suggest a visit to the neurologist to investigate the Q of smelling things that are not there. most of mine occurred in the evening. most were pleasant, such as cinnamon or vanilla, but some were unpleasant, such as cold ashes, acrid cigar smoke, cigarette smoke. onset and duration were unpredictable.

in consultation with my psychiatrist -- i have a lot of drs! -- we decided that perhaps it was a series of very, very small strokes, so we increased my lamictal, which is an antidepressant but has anti-seizure properties. since then, no more smells.

-- susie margaret
 
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LACal responded:
I noticed a bad smell behind my ears about 10 years ago. Even after I used shampoo, even with Selsun, the smell was still there somewhat. It was very frustrating. The smell starts around the area where my glasses touch the sides of my head & continues down to the bottom of the ear & the lobe. Even my ear piercing can get this smell. I use rubbing alcohol to remove the smell from all areas behind & on the external part of the ear. It's only temporary, but I only have to do it every other day or so. I use the alcohol after I shampoo so that I'll be totally fresh. So far that's been the best way to deal with it for me. I carry sealed individual alcohol pads in my purse in case I need a quick touch up while I'm out. It only takes a minute & it works!. I've used it under my breasts to freshen up as well if an odor develops.
 
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Malex08 responded:
Hi aberrob;
I'm famaliar with the smell behind the one ear, especially when I take off my sun glasses, that's when I always catch a swift of the strong smell, avoid touching it with your finger as the smell will linger and it stays on your finger until you wash or santitize your hands. Washing the ear helps some, but the smell comes right back before the day is over. I've also tried various techniques of dabbing behind my ear with essential oils like tea tree, lavender, peppermint, and sometimes alcohol or use peroxide, but the smell eventually returns. I did find something that seems to work really well, I used it for the first time and the smell never returned for the entire day. I used grapefruit seed oil (GSE), just a drop on your finger, just rub it in behind your ear where the smell is and you're done. I usually rub it in the morning after leaving home for work and it really keeps the smell away. If it irritates your ear a little, mix it with a drop of carrier oil, I use almond oil or any will do. It's really potent and wonder for bacteria culprits. Also, check out some of the health benefits GSE has, hope this helps!
 
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TJinVA replied to Malex08's response:
Ah, I didn't think about having my computer glasses on all day and wrapped behind my ear! That could explain it! Thanks
 
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nelp1 responded:
I know this is old but I thought I'd post in case someone comes across it later.

You might consider checking for metabolic disorders like diabetes to see if you body could be "off kilter" with it's sugar, etc. This changes the bacteria that can thrive on your system.

To help with the systems I can suggest a few things I didn't see mentioned.
1.) Hydrogen Peroxide on a cotton ball.
2.) Tea Tree oil, a small amount behind the ears. This has the added benefit of almost having a mild pine scent and helps mask the odor later in the day.
3.) Make note if any particular foods increase the amount of oil you generate behind your ears. If they do you may want to not eat those foods or only in moderation.

Good luck to anyone researching this problem. As others have said it's mainly bateria based feeding on the naturally occurring oils.
 
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tjscale responded:
Hi,

I had this problem for so many years without any solution and believe me it tormented me every moment. I take my bath and scrub my ears very well but give me a few hours and i get a very bad stench when i check the back of my ears by wiping it with my finger.

I tried using perfume on it also but same thing. Believe me i tried several things but they didn't work until one day i found a solution. I used my roll on those Dry Stick types and i just used my finger to wipe some of the roll on and put on the back of my ears and voila 24 hours later i am as clean as can be. You can try this out and see if it works for you.

Tunji.
 
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mudza responded:
I am so glad that I am a Muslim, after reading the responses of other people I realized that, we Muslims pray 5 times a day and before each prayer we wash certain parts of body with water, this is called WADU. One step in wadu is to rub your wet hands behind your ears in a certain manner(Masah). By repeating this activity 5 times a day you stay fresh and protected from such bacteria and awful smells.
May Allah guide everyone towards the right path.


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