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No see ems
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DanFLA1966 posted:
In South Florida we have critters commonly known as "No see ems" they are pesky and they can itch. Normally you would run into these pest in the evenings at the beach at certain times of the year. Have you heard of these pest? I have heard from a doctor that these pest burrow under the skin and use humans as a host. Can you dry them out with rubbing alcohol? I don't want to use benadryl, as this would only treat the itching. I want to eradicate the pest.
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Annie_WebMD_Staff responded:
Hi there,

I'm sorry but I am not familiar with bugs and pesty critters in the south. You may want to use the WebMD search engine with terms like mosquitos, ticks, and mites as the keywords to see if the articles you pull up are relevant to your questions.

If you think you've been exposed to any disease through bug bites please see your doctor for help.

- Annie
 
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Pam_WebMD_Staff responded:
I'm a native Central FL girl, and just happened upon your post today. We have loads of insects here in FL, with no-see-ums, and chiggers being two of the most annoying for their size. No-see-ums are tiny little biting flies related to mosquitoes. They are actually named biting midges. They swarm sort of like gnats. If you look closely when you feel one biting you, they are a small speck, small enough to get though a normal screen. Their bites can be treated as if they were a mosquito bite, with calamine or benadryl. You can deter them with regular insect repellent. They do NOT burrow under the skin. Read more about them here: http://creatures.ifas.ufl.edu/aquatic/biting_midges.htm Chiggers are even tinier bugs that people mistakenly believe will burrow under your skin. (I thought this too, till I looked up resources to give you in this post!) The red bumps you get with chigger bites is a reaction to the enzyme present in the chigger's mouth parts. I never knew this, I thought they burrowed as well! http://science.howstuffworks.com/question488.htm Other sites I visted say the same thing, and most do recomment treating chigger bites with a topical medicine containing antihistamine, like benadryl. The folk remedy is to use nail polish, but I can tell you from experience that it doesn't offer much relief. I've also seen chigger remedy in outdoorsy sorts of stores. But with my new knowledge that these aren't burrow under the skin bugs, you can bet I'll be using regular old benadryl in the future. I wouldn't use rubbing alcohol though, if your skin is irritated at all, the alcohol would sting like crazy. I love my job. I learn something new every day. I hope this helps you. Pam_WebMD
 
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lttlprncssdidi responded:
Hi! I'm in FL, too, and noseeums are the worst thing to bite. They don't burrow under your skin or anything, they just bite like a mosquito would. The critters that burrow are called chiggers and those are usually found in the spanish moss our state has. But, to get rid of the itchiness, just use OTC cortizone or something like it. To get rid of the flying insect, burn citronella candles or call pest control (sometimes they can spray). But the noseeums don't burrow under your skin. If you've got chiggers, use clear nail polish to suffocate them.
 
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Mahesh_Singh responded:
Pam,

Thanks for your informative response. I just returned from Orlando (Lake Mary area) yesterday after having played in a charity Golf event on Monday afternoon. That is where I unexpectedly encountered the No-see-ums - and I can tell you I am DYING of the itching and the inflamed bite marks on my arms! I shall run out shortly and get the calamine/ benadryl - just had a quesion there - when you say Benadryl - do you mean the normal cough syrup or are you refering to some lotion that has benadryl and can be applied directly on the arms?

Rgds and thanks!
 
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SAZZYLAZZY responded:
In N.Arizona, where the weather is cooler, spring & early summer camping, we are plagued with them. They usually go away after we receive rain, which either drowns the critters or drives them in the ground until the next spring. They are a very small, dark colored insect with a ferocious, long lasting, itchy bite. I've tried every kind of insect repellent but I'm still a feasting ground! I've tried putting fingernail polish, calamine, cortisone, lavender oil on the bites but to no avail. Only relief I've found is Epsom salts on a wet washcloth. Leave on for 15-20 min. repeating as necessary. Seems to help draw out what makes the itch.
 
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onihcinchino responded:
We visited Florida recently and I came home with bites all over me. My husband cut some of the aloe vera plants and I put the juice all over the bites and the itching stopped immediately and it has been a week since we came home and they are completely healed.
 
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andlund responded:
I definitely have something under my skin. I will get a little bump and is on fire I take it off and then I can feel itching in the area. My back is constantly itching. Hopt showers stop for ashile but it des not go awas. Iaf th sun gets ion the effected areas............., it will feel like it is on fire. I put srpay benedril and it helps.Any ideas Dermatoligists act like I am neurotic. It is usually worse 1-2 in the moring and my hight shirt will have blood dots from bites.
 
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andlund responded:
Thanks I live inFL on the beach. I thouight the DR said they do not burrow
 
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GneissRocks replied to SAZZYLAZZY's response:
Boy oh boy do I hpe this works. I live in St George, UT and spend a lot of time hiking in So. UT or along the Arizona Strip. Yesterday I was on the strip and noticed that my legs, ankles, arms, neck, ears were all being attacked at once by tiny flies no larger than a speck. Today, I am paying the price. Whenever I've been bitten by these little buggers I always get big weeping bite marks that last for a week or more. I'm heading for the pharmacy to get some Epsom salts and cortisone cream.
Thanks for the tip!
 
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advsign replied to GneissRocks's response:
www.http://noseeums.org/ has some history information on the noseeums. DEET works
 
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NOnoseeum replied to GneissRocks's response:
We developed a new all natural noseeum repellant spray on Sanibel Island Florida. We have terrible noseeums here. The spray works and has been selling in droves. You can order it from our website at www.nonoseeum.com ! This is what you are looking for!
 
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Sanibel4U replied to advsign's response:
This is a DEET free product and works great for noseeums and also mosquitoes. It has a pleasant smell as well.
 
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marysub responded:
These bites are like the "No see ems" BUT they have indeed burrowed under the skin, and they are "red no see ems" I am told. I have taken benadryl, used calamine lotion, for itching. Then, someone told me they had them and put something on them to burn them out, so I used vinegar and sure enough they are popping up. Now, I am digging them out and more and more are coming up, and they are black. I have holes where I have dug them out. I don't know what else to do. Went to the DR and he didn't know what they were and gave me a "dose pack" of predezone for 6 days. That didn't help. I am beside myself as what to do next....please send any ideas you have and if you know what these are
 
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zebow replied to marysub's response:
Oil of oregano oral and diffuser and tropica use all three 6 weeks.
They are black pepper mites or bird miyes same.


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