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Frequent Awakenings
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katieinmn posted:
I recently took a sleep study because I am overly tired during the day. I found out I do not have sleep apnea. The specialist did not have a lot of information for me. She mentioned drugs, however noted that they are not meant for long term use. The only things odd from my sleep study was that I woke up 92 times, and that I fell asleep within .2 minutes of the study beginning. I usually get plenty of time to sleep (10hrs per night). The sleep study said I got enough REM sleep. But I find it odd that I can get enough REM sleep when there are frequent awakenings throughout it. Any thoughts? I can't find any information on the web with similar findings. I am a 35 yr old female, in decent shape, no caffeine, and not depressed.
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Byroney_WebMD_Staff responded:
Dear katieinmn,

I wouldn't think I would just accept 92 awakening and no answers if it were me. How about getting a copy of your results and consulting with another sleep expert? Sometimes it takes a second or third opinion before you get the answers you need.

Best wishes for better sleep,

Byroney
 
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petepotamus responded:
I too suffered from being tired all the time. My doctor ordered a sleep study but it also didn't show anything conclusive. Each year I would feel more tired, they would order another sleep study and each year the results would show a decrease in REM sleep. After around 5 yrs. things had progressed enough for someone to say " You're right, you're now waking up enough times a night to justify how bad you feel in the day.
Diagnosis??
Idiopathic Hypersomnia
In other words.....No idea why , but you feel tired alot.
So sooner or later the tests should probably show what you are feeling. But that doesn't mean that you'll have any answers.
 
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An_206949 responded:
I'm curious about this too. I haven't done a sleep study, but I wake up tons of times every night. No problem falling asleep - just staying asleep. Sometimes I wake up feeling like I just ran a race. Luckily I don't feel overtired during the day, but I am suffering from slight depression now, and I think it is related to the poor sleep.
 
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Route101 responded:
I had sleep study after 3 months of daytime drowsiness - almost narcolepsy, especially when driving. Neurologist/sleep disorder specialist found I had no periods of deep sleep, only mid-sleep and REM sleep. My O2 was fine 93%to87%, stopped breathing only 51 times during night, though did mouth-breathe., so no apnea He said Zoloft and Klonopin can interfere with deep sleep, but I have been on those for for years. The only relatively recent change was being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes 18 months ago, starting on one sulfolnyurea that caused severe allergic rash after 8 months, going off it for several weeks, and then slowly starting Metformin XR, which affects metabolism. He said that if the body releases glucose into the bloodstream during night it can interfere with deep sleep. He agreed that when my metabolism and glucose levels finally stabilize my sleep might improve. As a temporary measure he prescribed Nuvigil 250mg for me to use when getting sleepy before noon. It works on the hypothalamus sleep control. Unlike "uppers" it has no side effects, but it is expensive. So far I have used only 2-3 pills in the 4 weeks since my appt. My Dr. increased my Metformin XL dose to 1,500mg after 3 months, but my BG is better but not fully under control. I do not take any sleep meds - they also can interfere with deep sleep.

You might look at your diet (especially type and amount of carbs) and lifestyle and see if they or something else are affecting your metabolism.

Talk to your physician about this.

Good luck.
 
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An_206950 responded:
I had a similar problem with finding out what was wrong with my sleep. It took 3 sleep studies to figure out part of it. I have hypopena - light breathing but I still feel like I am not sleeping or resting. After reading No More Sleepless Nights I think that I have a sleep disorder where my brain does not shut off - it thinks I am still awake. Drugs have not helped but self hypnosis has. I highly recommend Steven Gurgevich's CDs on sleep and relaxation - it has really helped me feel rested.
 
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goodbyesleepapnea replied to Byroney_WebMD_Staff's response:
  • I agree. A recent study revealed that up to one in four patients who have a sleep study in an accredited sleep lab have a 'false negative' test. That means that they were told their test was negative, but they actually had a sleep disorder that was missed (can you imagine what the incidence might be in an unaccredited labs?).
  • 92 awakenings is abnormal and there is a reason for it that should be identified. You could still have sleep apnea, hypopneas, upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) and need to see to see a board certified sleep specialist who knows what he/she is doing.
 
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sherri62965 responded:
I've had four identical sleep studies. I wake up 8-11 times an hour, every hour, every night of my whole life. If I reach stages 3 or 4 at all, its for only a few minutes total of the whole night. I'm 45 and have done this since birth and was simply diagnosed with idiopathic insomnia. Nothing has helped me. I recently seen a new sleep specialist who told me I had NO problems other than my perception of my sleep and I should see a psychiatrist. He said its perfectly normal "at my age" to wake up that often and to not reach deep sleep ever. I'm exhausted--physically and mentally and my body is slowly giving out and giving up. But when a doc looks at your studies and tells you that your looney, whats left to do?


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