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hiccups during sleep, anyone?
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sberryblond posted:
For at least the last 6-7 years, my husband says that I will get the hiccups while I'm sleeping. They don't happen every night. He says they cause the bed to shake and they wake him up. Me? I'm never aware of them. He says sometimes I'll stop breathing once they go away, then I start to breathe normally again. I know that I have very mild sleep apnea, based on a sleep study I had done about 4 years ago, but what's with the hiccups? I mentioned them to the pulmonologist who read my study and he said he had never heard of hiccups during sleep. Anyone out there with ideas as to the cause? I do know they are supposedly "organic" in nature, but that doesn't tell me enough. Help!
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Jordan_Josephson_MD responded:
Dear sberryblond You are certainly a case of hiccups through the night. The pulmonologist can no longer say that he has never heard of this. I believe that hiccups (also spelled hiccoughs) are connected with oxygen saturations. There are many theories as to what hiccups do and what causes them but it does not surprise me that someone with sleep apnea can suffer from hiccups. I think that because you have sleep apnea, you should immediately address the potential causes. My book ?Sinus Relief Now? would be a good way for you to start.

I don?t have much about your history, however, I would immediately get to a board certified otolaryngologist (ENT physician) who could help you treat your sleep apnea. There is a good possibility that treating the sleep apnea would get the hiccups to go away. In the meantime, depending on how bad the sleep apnea is you may want to try CPAP. That hopefully will help you with your hiccups. If not let us know, regardless, you still have to take care of the sleep apnea.

I hope this is helpful to you. Please keep us informed.

All the best.

DrJ
 
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Markki responded:
I started having hiccups at night when I was 6 (now I'm almost 20). I get them from time to time but they are super loud! It would be heard all over the house and last for 20 mins. but I would never wake up during them. I use to think I was the only one with that. What helps me is talking before I go to bed.
 
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nhmelmac responded:
I too have hiccups at night but they are so bad I wake up. You don't wake? Gosh, I wish I could stay asleep. I don't sleep well and have passed the sleep study. Can't figure it out???MM
 
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Jordan_Josephson_MD responded:
Dear MM

There are other people that suffer from hiccoughs or hiccups through the night. Many docs don?t know what to do about it and there are many patients that are frustrated as a result. I believe that hiccups are connected with oxygen saturations. I know that you passd the sleep study, but that could have ben a good night for you. Did you sleep or did you wake as you usually do? Those are good questions to go over with your sleep docs. Furhtermore, did you have hiccoughs witnessed during the sleep study?

There are many theories as to what hiccups do and what causes them but it does not surprise me that someone with sleep apnea can suffer from hiccups (also spelled hiccoughs). So the question is Do you have sleep apnea and what is the rest of your story? I think that you should immediately address the potential causes. My book ?Sinus Relief Now? would be a good way for you to start.

I don?t have much about your history, however, I would immediately get to a board certified otolaryngologist (ENT physician) who could help you treat your hiccoughs. If you have sleep apnea, there is a good possibility that treating the sleep apnea would get the hiccups to go away. You may need to go for another sleep study as well. And if you determine that you have sleep apnea or Oxygen desaturations, than depending on how bad the sleep apnea is you may want to try CPAP. Hopefully your docs will be able to figure out what is causing your hiccoughs and will be able help you find relief for hiccoughs which can be so irritating. If not let us know.

I hope this is helpful to you. Please keep us informed.

All the best.

DrJ
 
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Lynnllb responded:
My husband gets hiccups in his sleep or he shakes his head in a jerky movement without the 'hicccup' it drives me nuts and often up early at the weekend. Its supposed to be not possible but I assure you hiccups do happen in sleep!
 
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Lynnllb responded:
My husband hiccups in his sleep and/or shakes his head with a jolt. Drives me mad and happens most nights. He knows he does this because he has woken himself up before both shaking and hiccuping. Our medical friend said he didn't think it was possible because hiccups are a conscious movement but i can assure you they do occur in sleep.
 
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Jordan_Josephson_MD responded:
Dear Lynnllb:

You are right because I have had other patients that are awakened by hiccups. Hiccups can occur due to low oxygen levels and your husband may suffer from sleep apnea which can spark hiccups.

In my book Sinus Relief Now, we discuss the causes of CAID Chronic Airway Digestive Inflammatory Disease which are probably related to your husbands hiccups. However, you will need to learn all about it so that you will be able to figure out what is causing his hiccups. In addition, you should seek help from a sleep specialist who should perform a sleep study to see what is going on with your husband around the time of these hiccups. Hopefully the book will give you enough information to help the sleep specialist figure out what the underlying problem is and how you can resolve it.

Don?t despair there is an answer to your problem.

Good luck and all the best.

DrJ
 
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bklynman responded:
I am new to this and trying to post a new message but don't know how. By responding to this message at least I can get my question up there. I have a sleep study and need to know the AHI. IS the RDI the same as the AHI? I have read many different websites and only one site says it is and the others say it is different. I need this for professional reasons and not personel ones. If it is not then how can I get the AHI from the reports numbers? Thanks
 
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Caprice_WebMD_Staff responded:
Hi Bklynman and welcome to WebMD,

To start your own discussion so Dr. Josephson can more easily spot it and respond:

From here in this discussion click on the orange Back to Topics List button on the upper right. Once you're on the main board page, click on the orange Start Discussion button and away you go.
 
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hiccupqueen responded:
I'd like the answer to that one too, sberryblond. I have had the sleep tests for sleep apnea and have it (the obstructive type). Many Darth Vader CPAP's later, two surgeries, a dozen dental appliances and at 53 I have pretty much given up on resolutions aside from getting a bed that somehow keeps me upright all night. I've hiccupped throughout my life but in the past couple years, it's usually during my sleep (or I WAS sleeping until it woke me up.) Last night it happened several times and I can only assume it's from irregular breathing but don't have a solution. So if anyone does, please let us know!
 
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Darcee1 responded:
I thought I would respond to this even though it is an old discussion. I get hiccups that wake me up once a week or so, and I have GERD. My doctor told me that GERD is the cause of my hiccups. Some people have GERD and don't know it because everyone with GERD doesn't get "heartburn" or any other common symptom. Hiccups, especially while sleeping, can be a symptom of GERD though, as can asthma-like symptoms (from the acid irritating the lungs), dry cough, earaches, hoarseness, and other symptoms that one may not associate with GERD.

I was very suprised to learn that my feeling nauseated and getting hiccups were because of GERD because I never would have connected the two symptoms. I wanted to post about my experience with it so that it might help someone else.
 
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jasperirvinavila responded:
If you want to know more about the causes of hiccups you can try to visit: http://newshealthtoday.com/what-are-the-causes-of-hiccups-775.html for more info.


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