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Military Deployed and Sleep Apnea
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AlexisSerrano posted:
I've been diagnosed with Severe Sleep Apnea I'm 29 im not really over weight 194. I used a CPAP machine for a couple of month 4 years ago but it broke down on me and never followed up with getting it repaired. Im in the military and am bunking up with a fellow airmen. Ive been keeping him up for days now and he says he's worried about me because it sounds like im dyeing in my sleep. This has got me really worried and realize that when I do return home I need to continue to get help, but that will not be for months. Ive read that certain tongue exercises could help. Any help help or direction would be greatly appriciated. also any other advice would help. Thanks
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Jordan_Josephson_MD responded:
Dear AlexisSerrano: First of all, thank god we have people like you fighting for our country and our ideals. Pass that message to your fellow soldiers. For this I thank you. Second, I apologize for taking so long to respond. Most people have problems with CPAP, so this is not unusual. And yes, sleep apnea can be scary for people that are watching you sleep. I assume that you are in excellent shape so this is good for you. You might want to tape a rubber ball on your back if your apnea is worse when you lie on your back. This will make you sleep on your side and give you a better nights sleep. However, if you are obstructing when you lie on your side then you will still have a problem. I would see the medic at your military base and find out if they have anyone to evaluate you. They should have you do a sleep study as soon as possible. If they can?t maybe they can get you a CPAP machine that you can use until you return. Furthermore, if they can get you to an ENT doc and there are many in the military, (s)he can work you up for the possible causes leading to sleep apnea. The bottom line is that your problem is real and is not uncommon. There are answers for you and it will require work on your part to obtain a better quality of life. In any case, you must become pro-active in navigating your way through your problem.

My book Sinus Relief Now is especially good for people like you as it will give them many tips regarding their sleep apnea and will help you to figure out the various causes and the solutions to your problem(s). There may be many reasons why you are suffering from sleep apnea and you must identify all of them to resolve your problem. I am not sure what tongue exercises you have heard about. But your tongue can be a reason for sleep apnea but is only one of many. There are solutions like apparatus for tongue position which work if this is the underlying problem.

Sleep apnea is connected by what I call CAID- chronic airway-digestive inflammatory disease which connects sinus problems, allergies, asthma, snoring , sleep apnea, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). You should pick up a copy of my book Sinus Relief Now as it will help you to understand all of these problems and how they are connected in your body which may be causing your sleep apnea.

It sounds like you suffer from sleepapnea which can lead to fatigue and poor productivity and many people don?t even realize that they suffer because they think that is their normal level of energy. If you do, you are not alone, and many people have symptoms like you. Other symptoms of CAID can include either nasal symptoms- nasal blockage, stuffy or runny nose, yellow, green or white discharge, nasal bleeding (epistaxis), post-nasal drip, sinus or facial pain, pressure or headaches, dehydration, dental- gingivitis-gum disease, cavities, bad breath (halitosis), toothache, dental sensitivity, pain; ear problems- ear infections, hearing loss, ear pain, difficulty flying and diving and equalizing, tinnitus-ringing in the ears, dizziness; headaches- sinus and or migraines, eye problems like tearing- tear duct blockage (dacrocystitis), redness of the eye-conjunctivitis, swelling of the eye(s); chest problems-chronic cough, wheezing, asthma, bronchitis, shortness of breath; throat problems- throat clearing, hoarseness, laryngitis, sore throat, tonsillitis, difficulty swallowing-dysphagia; and/or nasal blockage leading to snoring, and/or sleep apnea.

And many of these people have suffered for years and some don?t realize that there is something wrong because they have had it so long they think that they have to live with it or it is normal. Or they know something is wrong and like you just don?t know what to do about it. Again, I am glad that you are being pro-active.

Allergies may be a problem and you might have to go for allergy testing. Tightness of the chest, wheezing, and chronic cough (by the way, cough is a very big reason f
 
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Jordan_Josephson_MD responded:
Part 2 of Answer

Allergies may be a problem and you might have to go for allergy testing. Tightness of the chest, wheezing, and chronic cough (by the way, cough is a very big reason for patients to seek medical care- and many leave their physician after one or two visits without an answer because asthma can be a more complex problem as you will understand as you read Sinus Relief Now)

My book, Sinus Relief Now, should set you on the right track. I think that there are a lot of people out there that have a problem like you and either don?t know what to do about it or have been told that they have to live with their problem and should know that there is an answer. And they shouldn?t have to live like that.

And again, my best to the troops and thanks for all of your good work. Good luck and keep us posted.

All the best

DrJ


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