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    chantix and wellbutrin
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    ekmarsh posted:
    I would like to attempt to quit smoking using Chantix. I am currently on Lexapro for depression. My doctor had concerns about Lexapro and Chantix together, but said OK to Chantix and Wellbutrin. Does this combination help to make quitting easier, and will my depression continue to be well managed?
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    Jonathan Foulds, PhD responded:
    It is not easy to predict individual response to medications or combinations of medicines, as we are all a little different. Presumably your own doctor knows your health history well and so is in the best position to advise on this. I am only aware of one relatively small published study of the combination of Chantix (varenicline) and Wellbutrin (bupropion). Researchers at the Mayo linic, led bt Dr John Ebbert treated 38 smokers with these two medicines combined. 71% were not smoking 3 months later and 58% were not smoking 6 months later (12 weeks after stopping taking the medicines). They found no increase in depressive symptoms. These are unusually high quit rates, although because this was not a placebo-controlled trial it is impossible to say whether it was the medicines that did it, or the counseling, or if these were simply a group of highly motivated smokers. But the results are encouraging. Both medicines are effective individually for smoking cessation so the combination may be even more effective. It always makes sense to get counseling support (e.g. from the national quitline: 1-800 QUIT NOW in USA) and to keep in touch with your prescriber so they can monitor your progress and any side-effects that occur.
     
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    ekmarsh replied to Jonathan Foulds, PhD's response:
    Thank you for this information, Dr. I am very hopeful for the outcome of this attempt!


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