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Recovery slow from new workout
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Rick1953 posted:
I recently started working out at a CrossFit gym where my wife works out. I'm supposed to work out Mon-Wed-Fri. I had my assessment on Saturday and by the time Monday came around I was still too sore to work out. They gave me a modified workout to avoid the sore areas but I'm feeling worse. It has been almost a week since the assessment workout and four days since the first actual workout and I'm still so sore I'm unable to complete simple exercises (i.e. modified push-ups). Not even one.

My wife swears by Aspercreme but my feeling is that this doesn't help the muscles heal, it just masks the pain and if I take that route and work out I could potentially do more damage.

1. Am I correct in my assessment that if I've not recovered enough to complete simple exercise movements without significant pain that I should continue to rest?

2. Am I correct in my assessment that masking the pain with a pain reliever in order to enable me to work out increases the probability of additional damage and an even longer recovery?

3. Does four days seem excessive recovery time for a set of pushups, pullups and situps given no significant exercise in about 25 years?
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rogervs responded:
im 52. i have been a constnat exerciser for my entire life - so part of my experience does not relate to you at all. however, in my experience - when i start exrcising a new part of my body - the pain increases from the use of unused muscle groups over a weeks time.

my technique is to exercise those parts daily in a light workout. i assume that as the evaluation process - you were asked to do the maximum number of repetitions you could do, and being a man, you did more than you should. it's not a competition - you need to recognize that perhaps your max is your max you feel comfrotable at in this point of your exercise history or lack thereof.

i suggest you exercise every day lightly - every place it hurts if it is muscular pain - skeletal pain would send me straight to a doctor. additionally - add CoQ10 to your supplements and take some advil ...

you porobably have a combination of muscle soreness caused by overuse and lack of ability to process out the lactic acid buildup in your muscles ... depending on your prescriptions this can be hindered by certain drugs like statins (crestor, lipitor). i take 200mg CoQ10 daily. that might be a lot for you.

good luck - as you get stronger and in better condition the pain leaves and never comes back (mostly)
 
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EdSutton_RPSGT responded:
My wife swears by Aspercreme but my feeling is that this doesn't help the muscles heal, it just masks the pain and if I take that route and work out I could potentially do more damage.

You are correct - working out with pain is a signal to stop.[br>[br>1. Am I correct in my assessment that if I've not recovered enough to complete simple exercise movements without significant pain that I should continue to rest?

Correct - Now you need rest from the exercises, not inactivity, proper sleep, proper hydration and proper nutrition, connective tissues, muscles, the body's electrical and recuperation systems were all challenged by the workout. You need a time of workout hardening before starting workout programs.

Workout one set per body part per week, until the weight and repetitions have increased enough to give a slight feeling of "pump" muscular fullness, and after 4-5 days you feel good. Do not add sets until that occurs - it could take 6-12 weeks depending on age, health, nutrition, etc. [br>[br>2. Am I correct in my assessment that masking the pain with a pain reliever in order to enable me to work out increases the probability of additional damage and an even longer recovery?

Very correct[br>[br>3. Does four days seem excessive recovery time for a set of pushups, pullups and situps given no significant exercise in about 25 years?


Not at all. Stop the body weight driven exercises till you have progressively work hardened in the gym. Body weight is too much on unconditioned joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles, Bodybuilding is built using young models of fitness and physical condition levels, you are stuck your body the rest of your life, Torn shoulder joints, knees, back, etc stay with you long after gym member ship is over.


Instead of pushups try dumbell bench presses flat, incline, decline and cable work. start light build up gradually ligaments tendons connective tissue are limiting factors


Instead of pull ups try lat bar work, cable work for lats. Start doing basic conditioning fundamentals, light deadlifts, light squats in a power rack, light calf work, light over head clean & press both dumbells & barbell , to learn proper and safe form.


Go to Utube look up Lee Priest, Mike O Hern, Bill Pearl, etc - bodybuilders that worked out will less than usual injuries, that tried to take care of themselves without letting ego ruin health in the rush to build up.


situps, put a folded towel on the floor to pad your knees, in front of a cable rack, with handle at highest comfortable stretch position, kneel, hold handle, do abd crunches with light weight, that gradually increases once conditioned till situps no longer hurt lower hip tie ins and under rib cage and only muscle burn is felt once enough sets and reps performed.


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