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Broken femur, sprained ankle, injured knee.
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DGorrie posted:
Ok so May 28th, 2010 I was involved in a motorcycle crash where I broke my left femur. Basically I was sliding on the asphault and hit a curb with the outside of my left leg. The doctors put a rod and some pins in my leg and I went on to spend a lot of time in bed.

So now it's been quite some time and I'm trying to get myself back into shape. I have been working out again for the past month. Right now I have pain in my hamstring area during certain movements. If I lay on my right side and try to lift my left leg into the air, like doing a half split, I have a good amount of pain in my hamstring area. Basically where the impact of the curb was.

I also have pain in just under my knee cap where it runs down to my shin. This hurts mostly during squat type exercises.

My ankle was also sprained in the accident and is still pretty weak.

Basically my questions are. What should I do to get my muscles in the impact area healthy again? Could the pain in my knee just be things healing still? What is the best way to get my ankle healthy again and is it ok to exercise it fairly hard?

Here are some pictures. You can see the bruising on my leg from the impact. Also I have a picture here of the injured areas.
http://s479.photobucket.com/albums/rr151/SNapperMx/My%20Crash/

If anyone can help me THANKS!!
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jusim81 responded:
Have you seen a physiotherapist?
 
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DGorrie replied to jusim81's response:
I haven't seen anyone because I haven't had money and no health insurance. I actually just got health insurance this week though.
 
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Amelia_WebMD_Staff responded:
I just wanted to say that I am glad that you are alive!

Hopefully, now that you have your insurance you can have a professional medical examination. Please keep us posted and take care of yourself!
 
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bpreston4 replied to Amelia_WebMD_Staff's response:
Amen to that! You can recover from anything, as long as you're still alive! So thank god, and I'm happy for ya..

Anyways, it sounds like you need some time to continue to improve. These aches and pains should go away over time, after you've had adequate time to recover. Physical therapy would be a great idea, and will give you the movements you need, to help re-strengthen.

As for the sprained ankle , rehab is also a great way to help it heal and recover. Rehabilitation is the way to go for all of the injuries you suggested. Sticking to a schedule is the only way to ensure recovery.
 
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DGorrie replied to bpreston4's response:
Ok so I've talked to a physical therapist who basically couldn't tell me anything I don't already know.

I still have pain in my outer hip/leg. It is mostly when doing something like walking up stairs.

I'm thinking maybe the screws up into my hip are sticking out of the bone and causing pain in the muscle maybe?

Look at this X-Ray here:
http://s479.photobucket.com/albums/rr151/SNapperMx/My%20Crash/?action=view&current=35881_10150188818470024_507395023_12892511_1952993_n.jpg
 
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DGorrie replied to DGorrie's response:
Also if I lay on my left side in bed it will start to hurt pretty bad. Keep in mind it has been over a year since I broke it and I'm a pretty physically fit person who works out 6 days a week.
 
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Amelia_WebMD_Staff replied to DGorrie's response:
I am soooo incredibly sorry that you are still dealing with this pain. Have you spoken to your doctor about your thoughts with the screws? What the professional's response?

Crossing fingers for you!
Amelia


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