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Whatis a "micro vascular stroke"?
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clkirby posted:
Results of a brain MRI revealed I had a "micro vascular stroke" my doctor's office said this wasn't a big problem, but I needed to change my life style. Such as watching my blood pressure, my cholesteral, take asprin every day, take fibre supplements and take Omega 3 fish oil. If there is no danger why al the changes? Thanks in advance.

Charles Kirby
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Amelia_WebMD_Staff responded:
Hi Charles,

I am sorry for such a late response, but I was unable to find any information on this "microvascular stroke". I think that it would be a good idea to call your doctor and speak with him/her about this diagnosis and its exact definition as well as possible future risks.

I hope that you find your answer soon and keep us posted.
Best Wishes! Amelia
 
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Seaumas responded:
A R.N. for over 30yrs. who worked in several critical specialties, I became morbidly obese, suffered with hypertension and bipolar disorder Instead of seeking proper help I 'soldiered on', smoked heavily, started drinking and wound up one night not knowing the correct drugs, forgetting patients' names and becoming highly disoriented. I had to take a taxicab home. I went to urgent care, scheduled a stat appt. with my doctor. An MRI, stress test, blood work and neuro workup revealed I had not one, but a series of microvascular strokes. Its been a tough three years and I've rehabbed as far as I can get, restored my weight to when it was when I was 30 yrs., quit smoking, drinking and going to fast food drive ins and consuming vast amounts of 'quad bypass' comestibles. I never worked after that night and was put on a disability pension. It has been particularly difficult for my wife, who loves me and cares for me, but has reached the end of her energy and tolerance. She has suggested I go back living in a commune, put myself in an Old Soldiers Home, get assisted living or at least seek out proper counseling and advocacy. I think we've all looked at some poor soul and said, "I think I have problems; See that guy over there? He's got it ten times worse and I ought to be thankful for what I still have." Well: Kinda looks like, sort of, you know, seems like I did it to myself; But these strokes also run in my family. None of them had Alzheimers, but what then was called "senile dementia". I'm relieved to know I'm clean of prions. I can now walk, drive, know where I am, am not frightened or angry and eat well and exercise. I have leared to prioritize my emotions and energies, conserve energy, seek freedom and happiness. I've always known how to laugh at pain- or burst out in a big grin. But I don't wan to be separated from my lifelong lover. I would appreciated your comments.
Thank You.
 
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Seaumas replied to Amelia_WebMD_Staff's response:
there is quite a bit of information available. But you may want to go to askanurse.com. Check out a Merck Manual and sneak a peek at places that carry medical and nursing texts. Barnes & Noble has nice reading nooks. I've never seen any at Borders. Then, just sit down, go to the index and find the pages. Neuroscience Nursing texts are usually excellent. If you have tried Wiki, then at least you can be reassured they have plenty of resources and leads. (Please be cautious of Wikipedia's main texts and always look at the discussion pages. You will most often find criticisms and corrections there.) Or simply use this page.
Almost any major hospital will give handouts, prints, pamphlets and resources about strokes.
doctors a very busy. So, ask a R.N. (not a L.P.N. or Nursing Assistant.) You will get good answers, less technical and more tailored for your needs. If the problem is current, I suggest Urgent Care, not the ER. You will get service much faster. If you see a stroke happening, the 'magic window' is usually within fifteen minutes. A clot busting agent may be put into the blood stream within 3hrs. Brain cells start dying within 3 min.
May I recommend both American Red Cross First Aid and CPR training. To me the ARC does it best. Most emergency response professionals use the American Heart Association's CRP, First Aid, EMT certification, Advanced Cardiac Life Support, ACLS). The AHA certifications cost less money and you will be taught by active, front line, emergency response professionals.


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