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55 yrs young
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clarkplbg posted:
I have just turned 55, had a Brain Stem Stroke 3 weeks ago, and have regained almost all uses of Body Functions. I still get flustered and disorientated alot and find it very difficult to multitask. I returned to work Full Time but we are not very busy at all, whci is a Godsend... I am Type 2 Diabetic which is the only contributing factor to my Stroke.. I smoked for 20 years but quit 6 years ago.. I just started walking everyday and am eating much better foods..
Seems like everyone here has had at least a second Stroke or more.. I do not want to have another Stroke,,
Please, someone give me more tips to avoid having another Stroke...
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JeffDaddy responded:
Sounds like you're doing the right things. Exercise, diet, reduce stress (BP), be the right weight all help. Do some introspection regarding your lifestyle for secondary factors that you may think are unimportant, but may be critical. In my own case, for example, I had been battling to keep a tooth for some time and had gum disease. There are studies out there that show a correlation between the constant input of irritants from the gum disease into the blood that can increase your risk of heart disease and stroke. I also over estimated the amount of exercise I was doing. It's difficult and humbling, but part of the drill to avoid more problems.


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