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Having a Stroke in your 30's
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Kaikingmom posted:
On December 31, 2009 at 32 yrs old I was having numbness on my leftside. I was taken to the hospital to be told that I was having a stroke. When I was at the hospital the doctors did (what seem like a million) test and said that they couldn't find out why I had this stroke but they did say that I did have about 12 spots that they thought were TIA's . Then about 4 months later I had 2 strokes at the same time on the back of the brain and the other on the front of the brain on the opposite side while I was backing out of the driveway. Yet again I was rushed to the hospital and then I was life flighted to another hospital. I was told by the doctors they had no clue as to why I was having these strokes. After having my last stroke I am having tremors all day even when I am resting. I also keep losing strenght on side, along with being clumsy and restlessness.
11 years ago my uncle died from ALS and last year my grandmother (his mother) died with Parkinson's, is there anyway that maybe the doctors are just focusing on the fact that I had these strokes at a young age and not looking at the whole picture with my symptoms?
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Richard C Senelick, MD responded:
I guess my first questions would be, are they certain that these are strokes that you are having? Although it happens, you are young to be having multiple strokes. When I read your story, the first thing that came to my mind was the possibility of Multiple Sclerosis or a similar illness. The onset of multiple neurological symptoms that come and go associated with white spots in your brain suggests this as a possibility. Did the doctors do a spinal tap or other tests to consider MS as a possibility?

Have you been back to a neurologist? You might want a second opinion. You would need to get a copy of all of your scand, records and tests and then find a major referral center in your area. It may be that someone needs to take a fresh look at your situation. If you are already seeing a neurologist, ask them what they think of the possibility of MS. Sometimes, once the doctors give you a diagnosis it sticks with you every time you show up with a new symptom. I have done this and needed to be reminded to take a fresh look at the patient.

Good Luck
After your stroke you may be experiencing a new normal, but remember what George Eliot said- It is never too late to be what you might have been. You still can achieve new goals.
 
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Kaikingmom replied to Richard C Senelick, MD's response:
Thank you for your input. I did request for a spinal tap and I got it but when the results came back they said it wasn't MS. I am now on neurologist number 4, I have even been to the Cleveland Clinic and no one has any clue as to what is going on. I will definitely let the doctor know about the new symptoms.
 
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RANDIE97 replied to Kaikingmom's response:
Dear Kaikingmom,
I just read "stroke in your 30's" your story and believe me I understand what you have been threw. I am 46 and had my first stroke (thought was my first...) in 05' and they did a bunch of tests on me to and couldnt figure why i was having them also til the only thought the drs said i had a pinched nerve in my neck needless to say I went to many other drs since then. I finally went to Washington hospital in D.C In 07' where they finally found out by doing a bubble study that I have a hole in my heart that I was born with NEVER KNEW....anyways, I still had strokes till my new neurologist suggested i get an MRA of the brain and I found out that I have atrophied on the rt side. So wondering if this could al be genetic I took my daughter to be checked out (childrens hospital center) and the neurologist there told me that before they could fix the hole and stop the strokes I had to go to a hematologist to find out where the clots where coming from (still working on that). So like I said before I understand drs not knowing what to do with you been and somewhat still going through it, but be patient hopefully they will figure it out for you,


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Richard C. Senelick M.D. is a physician specializing in both neurology and the subspecialty of neurorehabilitation. He did his undergraduate and medic...More

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