Skip to content
Includes Expert Content
Brain stroke, right side, 78 years old
avatar
MazHey posted:
My 78 years old mother had a major right side brain stroke. It happened in her sleep and she was taken to hospital next day. This happened 7 days ago. This is the situation:
- she can talk, some troubles in speech f.ex the letter "r" is hard to say
- she seems to remember everything and also very recent happenings
- she can eat and swallowing is ok
- she can see but there might be some vision trouble
- right side is working
- she has left side has hemoparesis, she can feel but her arm and foot are not moving
- she is neglecting her left side, she looks mostly to the right but some progress is happening, she turns her eyes to the right when asked

The neurologist said that the damage is bad but we should not lose our hopes. The active physioterapeutic cure is now starting.

Thos of you who have lived throught something like this could you tell about your exepriences and give your comments. Thank you.
Reply
 
avatar
Richard C Senelick, MD responded:
You are getting excellent advice from your neurologist. Although we would all feel better if your mother had some movement on her left side, it is still far too early to despair. You want to make sure she gets therapy everyday and that people don't give up on her. The neglect can be a problem, but it usually gets much better over time. From a therapy standpoint, very little will help the neglect problem. It can take a long time to improve in some patients, so don't give up. Once the neglect clears, patients can work more effectively because they can focus on the affected side.

If your mother cannot go home, make sure she continues to get therapy. If the time comes when the therapist feels they cannot help, make sure that they give you a "home program" that you and your family can continue.

Good Luck.
After your stroke you may be experiencing a new normal, but remember what George Eliot said- It is never too late to be what you might have been. You still can achieve new goals.
 
avatar
MazHey replied to Richard C Senelick, MD's response:
Thank you so much for the answer Richard. The neurologist told us that there is still swelling in the brain. How long will it take until the swelling goes away? Is there any chance that the swelled part of the brain would work better after the swelling stops?

One thing that bothers us that our mother is very absent minded. She just lays down eyes open and looks to the right. She answers when we question something and the answers are always very clear but quite short sentences. My mother has listened a lot of music and I took some CD:s to the hospital and we play them to her. I've understood that music is good therapy. Now she asked to see the televison. Her vision has not been tested yet but when she looks to the left side her eyes (especially the left eye) goes up and down. Maybe wathcing tv would be good therapy for the eyes?
 
avatar
MazHey replied to MazHey's response:
Today, the 10th day after the stroke, the swelling of my mothers brain got worse and she lost her consciousness. She didn't react to speech. Doctors said that there is no new stroke and no blood in her brains. The swelling is just too strong. I just came from hospital and my mother was sleeping steadily and breathing quite normally. I am devastaed because I really thought that the things could only go to a better direction.Now we can only wait and pray.
 
avatar
Richard C Senelick, MD replied to MazHey's response:
I am sorry to hear that things have taken a turn for the worse. Unfortuantely we are not very good a treating severe brain swelling after a stroke. Medicines are not much help nor is surgery. We are not sure why this happens in some patients who seem to be doing well. It sounds like your medical team is communicating with you and giving you good advice. I wish there was something we had to offer.
After your stroke you may be experiencing a new normal, but remember what George Eliot said- It is never too late to be what you might have been. You still can achieve new goals.
 
avatar
MazHey replied to Richard C Senelick, MD's response:
I've understood that the peak of the swelling is between 48-72 h after it started. Right now there has been about 48 h. I guess that it is normal that patient is unconscious during the severe period of the swelling. I've read that the swelling takes 2 weeks or even more to go totally down and only after that we'll know what the real damage is. If our mother will eventually wake up. Her sleep seems to be very calm and if I didn't know what has happened I would think that she is just sleeping normally. I touched her face with a wet paper an she responded to that a little. So it seems that she is not in a coma. My own prediction is that if she will fight through this day she will have a chance.
 
avatar
MazHey replied to MazHey's response:
A very importatnt question to you Richard.

The doctor said that the pupils of my mother do not react very much to the light. They are dilated. I've understood that the pressure in the head is the reason why pupils are not reacting as they should be. Am I right?
 
avatar
MazHey replied to MazHey's response:
I keep on reporting. My mother is still unconscious. She is in a deep sleep. There is some swelling also on her hands and a little on her feet. Also on chins and neck. The doctor said that on alternative that the swelling is a result of aspirin which was given to her several days in a row. It looks that they didn't make the kidney test before they started to give her aspirin. Now she has been almost 4 days without aspirin but the selling is still there.
I just wonder that if aspirin is the reason for the swelling, how long will it effect?
 
avatar
Richard C Senelick, MD replied to MazHey's response:
I afraid it would inappropriate to try and answer specific questions about her care. Her doctors have all the information and are in the best position to answer these types of questions. There are so many different variables and things that can be going on, that any answer from me would be a "guess". That would not be helpful or professional.

Good Luck
After your stroke you may be experiencing a new normal, but remember what George Eliot said- It is never too late to be what you might have been. You still can achieve new goals.
 
avatar
MazHey replied to Richard C Senelick, MD's response:
My mother lost her conscious 10 days after the stroke. Now she has been over 5 days unconscious. Neurologist said that it was a massive cerebral edema and didn't give us any hope. Another doctor said that he can't give any kind of prognosis. My mother is in a deep sleep almost all the time. A few times during the day her eyes are open and she seems to hear things but we can't contact her in any way. All we can do is to wait that if the swelling in her brains go away and they start to work somehow. I've read that the mortality is very high in these situations during the first days. Has somebody lived through this kind of situation?
 
avatar
nannew58 replied to MazHey's response:
Hi MazHey,

Although my mom didn't suffer the same type of stroke as your mom, I can feel some of what you are expressing. My mom just opened her eyes for the first time in two weeks yesterday. But mostly, she sleeps. The doctors that I am working with are very communicative. They lay it all out. Our prognosis is not very good. But we too, are in a wait-and-see mode. It is so difficult waiting. I know. I hang on to hope one moment, then I am in despair in another moment. I am sorry that you are going through this. It is horrific. I know. Please write me back if you want to.

My prayers are with your mom, Nancy
 
avatar
MazHey replied to nannew58's response:
Thank you for your kind words Nancy. I just came from the hospital. My mother had eyes open but didn't react. I talked with the doctor and she showed me the CT photos that were taken after the stroke and afte my mother went unconscious. The place were the stroke hit looked bad but the swelling didn't look as bad I had expected. The doctor said that in some cases people wake up but it is impossible to say if my mother will. Doctor said also that the majority of the patients don't live this long after this kind of swelling. So all we can do is wait and see what will happen and pray.
 
avatar
nannew58 replied to MazHey's response:
Yes, you are right. It is the waiting game. It is a very painful process. Do you have additional support? Siblings, partner, father? I do know how you feel. It is horrendous. I spent all day at the hospital again today. I am happy with the little victories (eyes opening, squeezing of my hand) but most of the time I think, how can she ever come back? Is this what she wants? Overwhelming. Hard decisions. I am so sorry you are going through this as well. Nancy
 
avatar
MazHey replied to nannew58's response:
Now they had to take off the intravenous drip because the swelling. Especially her arms are quite swelled. The doctor said that this is the normal procedure in these situations. If the swelling goes away the drip might be back. If my mother lives through this stage. I am very desperate and it is impossible to concentrate to anything. I have several other people to share my feelings.
 
avatar
An_246500 replied to MazHey's response:
My sympathies. Mom had a left side stroke 8 days ago with 3CVAs, may sleep another 3 wks. Praying for swallow in 2 days. Rehab Dr. rubbed a shoe horn device on both soles of feet, responsive. Nothing ever changes but her roommates. How many beds are in your Stroke Unit rooms? I just want to compare. My SU is 2 4 bed rooms. But 6 patient max, so first room stays full and mom will only have 1 roomie, I figure.


Featuring Experts

Richard C. Senelick M.D. is a physician specializing in both neurology and the subspecialty of neurorehabilitation. He did his undergraduate and medic...More

Helpful Tips

Any Exercise is Good!Expert
A recent study looked at exercise in people with Parkinson's Disease, http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/740854 but I think the results ... More
Was this Helpful?
4 of 7 found this helpful

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Related Drug Reviews

  • Drug Name User Reviews

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.