Skip to content

    Announcements

    Exciting News for WebMD Members!

    We've been busy behind the scenes building new message boards for you. You'll have new and easier ways to find messages, connect with others, and share your stories.

    And, this will all be available on your smartphone or other mobile device!

    What Do You Need to Do?

    The message board you're used to will be closing in the coming weeks. While many of your boards will be making the move to our new home, your posts will not. Want to keep a discussion going? Save posts you want to continue (this includes your member profile story), so that you can re-post them in the new message boards.

    Keep an eye here and on your email inbox, we'll be back in touch soon to give you all the information you need!


    Yours in health,
    WebMD Message Boards Management

    Includes Expert Content
    Occipital Stroke - Blindness- St. Louis
    avatar
    An_247296 posted:
    Is there anyone in St. Louis caring for a person who suffered vision loss due to stroke? Seeking discussion and mutual support.
    Reply
     
    avatar
    Richard C Senelick, MD responded:
    There are a number of web sites and support groups dedicated to helping people who live with a visually impaired individual. Here are a few links. I hope they help and Good Luck.

    http://www.livingblind.com/blind-people.html

    http://www.webmd.com/eye-health/features/learning-to-live-with-blindness
    After your stroke you may be experiencing a new normal, but remember what George Eliot said- It is never too late to be what you might have been. You still can achieve new goals.
     
    avatar
    suppt responded:
    My sympathies from the East Coast. Also among the effects of my 87 year old mom's stroke. How old if I may ask?
     
    avatar
    An_247296 replied to suppt's response:
    Thank you for your kind reply. My brother had the stroke in April 2011. He was 44 years old at the time. He is 45 years old now. We searched high and low for doctors, therapists, but they are stumped with occipital blindness. Finally, we found an optometrist and a chiropractor in St. Louis MO where we live to work with him. Although his field is limited to lower left quadrants, he can see movement, and he can scan to see simple shapes and objects now. We pray he can at least see his shaving cream, cereal box, etc, in the future. My prayers are with you. I am sure your heart aches for your mother. Best,
    Susan


    Helpful Tips

    Stroke and brain hemorrhage
    My mom 68 had a stroke/hemorrhage 22 days before and released from hospital and move to rehab now. She is not responding very well but ... More
    Was this Helpful?
    1 of 1 found this helpful

    Related Drug Reviews

    • Drug Name User Reviews

    Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

    FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.