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Stroke answers/fear
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ceemree posted:
I had a stroke 6 years ago. (age 46). I had extremely high blood pressure that had been overlooked and written off as white coat hypertension (fear of the Dr.) Well I went on WebMD while at work and looked up the symptoms. It told me it was a possible stroke! Did I go right to the ER? Oh no, I went home and went on with my day. I fell in the night and had right sided numbness in the am. I called my Dr. and they told me to go directly to the Hospital. After cat scan was negative I had an MRI that indeed showed a stroke.Well things went well and I dont have any major disabilities. I have my BP undercontrol but I still worry. I asked my dr about taking a medication advertised on TV. At that point he said "oh you cant take that its for ischemic stroke and you had a intracranial bleed. If we gave you a clot buster in the ER, you wouldnt be sitting here." I left the appointment totally confused. I never had one person tell me that information before! And I did get a heparin injection in the er. I have requested my medical records and am waiting for them. I feel like I'm right back at square one. Now I dont know what to believe. If I had a bleed shouldnt they have had me follow up with a neurologist? I have never seen anyone but my internist
for my stroke. I feel like I'm a ticking time bomb. Has anyone else dealt with this kind of stroke and what was the follow up?
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Richard C Senelick, MD responded:
I agree that it is a confusing situation. CT Scans are very sensitive at detecting blood in thebrain. If you had an intracerebral bleed, I would not expect your CT Scan to be negative. I agree you need to get a copy of the records and ask for a referral to a neurologist. If you had an ischemic stroke without blood, they may very well want to put you on preventive therapy.

Good Luck
After your stroke you may be experiencing a new normal, but remember what George Eliot said- It is never too late to be what you might have been. You still can achieve new goals.
 
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itmatsb responded:
What great information that you received from Dr. Senelick. That information will help you in your future path.
 
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ceemree replied to Richard C Senelick, MD's response:
Thank you Dr. Senelick for your information. I did just get my records and it says there is a 1.1 cm infarction in the left corona radiata. Still trying to figure it out. But at least I have something in hand. Well one good thing about this is my husband has joined the conversation on the stroke. He has avoided talking with me about the stroke, since it happended. I know how I feel and he probably feels about the same.
 
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Richard C Senelick, MD replied to ceemree's response:
It sure sounds like you need to see a neurologist to get this sorted out and determine if you had an ischemic stroke or a bleed. That will determine whether you need to be on anti-platelet medication.

The corona radiata is the area between the surface of the brain where the nerve cells are located and the deeper parts of the brain. It contains the axons or cables that carry the messages from the nerves.

It is important that you get serious about preventing another stroke. Here is a link to an article I wrote on Secondary Prevention .

The American Stroke Association also has excellent information.

Good Luck
After your stroke you may be experiencing a new normal, but remember what George Eliot said- It is never too late to be what you might have been. You still can achieve new goals.


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Richard C. Senelick M.D. is a physician specializing in both neurology and the subspecialty of neurorehabilitation. He did his undergraduate and medic...More

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