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bleeding of the brain
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An_248597 posted:
My dad is 81 and has congestive heart failure. He did have type 2 diabetes. The VA took him off his diabetic medicine because he had lost so much weight, the doctor thought the medicine wasn't needed anymore.
My mom died last year. Since my dad has been drinking more than usual and eating badly,
Just about 3 weeks ago, his feet started swelling, turning red and stickyness was sweating out of the feet and lower legs. It caused blisters.
Then, over the last week, my dad seemed to loose control of when walking. He fell a lot. He was conscious of his falls afterwards.
This weekend, it got where he couldn't walk without help. Finally this morning, He couldn't use his legs at all. Along with these symptoms he seemed to get winded a lot.
My brother took him to the hospital. They did a ct scan and said he had bleeding near his brain because of the falls.
I have a hard time with this diagnosis, because my dad braced his falls with his hands, he doesn't have contusions or bruises on his head, and how is that related to him not being able to walk?
I usually associate bleeding and brain with strokes.
Please help me with a direction to go. Do I need to ask a particular question. Thanks
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Richard C Senelick, MD responded:
Thank you for your question. There are a number of issues to address. The first is to look at ,Why is he falling?" He may have devloped problems with the nerves in his legs and that is why he is losing his balance. His increased use of alcohol can also contribute to the loss of balance and falling.

At age 81 you can fall, not hit your head that hard and still get bleeding in the brain. As we age, the brain shrinks and there is more space between thebrain and the skull. There are very small veins in this area that can tear and caus bleeding after what seems like trivial trauma. In addition, excessive drinking can alter the ability of the blood to clot and people are more likely to bleed.

You need an agressive plan to alter his lifestyle, manage his medical problems and protect him from falls. This is not easy and can mean alot of work for everyone involved.

Good Luck
After your stroke you may be experiencing a new normal, but remember what George Eliot said- It is never too late to be what you might have been. You still can achieve new goals.


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Richard C. Senelick M.D. is a physician specializing in both neurology and the subspecialty of neurorehabilitation. He did his undergraduate and medic...More

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