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Low Flow TIa
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camgm posted:
I am a 44 year old female.
I was 39 when I had my first low-flow TIA.
After cat-scans and an MRI, my doctor discovered that my vertebrobasilar artery is about 1/3 the size in diameter that it should be. It is not due to blockages, but apparently a congenital defect.
I also suffer from chronically low blood pressure. After numerous tests including a tee exam, where no holes were found to be in my heart. My cardiologist has no explanation as to why my bp runs so low. On a good day I average about 90/50.
So these events are becoming more and more frequent. Each one a bit more painful and it is beginning to take longer and longer for me to regain my mental faculties.
My doctor has advised me that there is no surgical options for my particular problem, and has me on a regimen of Plavix, minimum of 80oz of fluids a day, and a high sodium diet.
I'm beginning to see that I am having more and more episodes when the weather is hotter.
Any suggestions on any possible treatments he hasn't thought of yet? I have seen neurologists, cardiologists, and pretty much any other ogists that you can imagine.
Any insight that you can offer would be appreciated.
Also I don't know if this means anything but my personality is beginning to change drastically. I used to be such an extrovert, crowd loving, fun person. Now I have panic attacks if I go into crowded areas, and other to go to work, I never want to leave my room.
Thanks for reading.
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