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asolution posted:
Dr I am a 51 yr old female non smoker, occasional drinker (1 drink aprx once a month, bmi =34.
I had a tia in 2005, my stroke symptoms lasted for apx 24 hrs. I was paralyzed on the right side of my body and could not speak for periods of time during that 24 hour period, I was hospitalized the 1st time for aprx 7 days, (blood pressure out of control).
I now take meds to control my blood pressure, Losarton, Clonodine, and Labetolol ,hydralazine . he also asked me to take spirolactin, but the muscle cramps I get from taking it are so bad when I take that I stopped taking it. and cholesterol reducing meds. As I support myself I rushed back to work so I could pay the rent. My Dr and I have struggled to control my blood pressure. (I am getting better numbers since omitting meat and eggs from my diet)
I have not seen a neurologist since I left the hospital and I complained of no difficulties with walking priot to leaving the hospital just so I could get back to work. The truth is
I had a weak right leg then and 8 years later I cannot walk without pain or severe cramping in that leg, from the upper thigh all the way down to the calf and then there are days were the Achilles area is so sore that I can hardly lift my foot off the ground this usually occurs directly after getting out of the bed with the area being swollen and tender to the touch, the pain will subside after a couple of hours of being out of the bed. Due to the weakness in the right leg it is cause me to walk with difficulty and put to much stress on the other leg and causing pain in this leg also. I can barely walk two blocks and sometimes I am just pushing myself to move. I feel that if I do not get a handle on this soon I will be in to much pain to walk at all. I already wish I had a walker sometimes as I have to just sit down or stop walking altogether because of the pain. I recently saw a foot dr who prescribed 1st a leg/brace/wrap thing and then shoe inserts, both hurt miserable and I cannot wear the inserts all day.
When ever I try to talk to my dr. about it he suggest I see a psychiatrist as if my pain is in my head so I stopped mentioning it but I am really need help and don't know where to turn
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Richard C Senelick, MD responded:
Pain and cramping in the leg can arise from a variety of reasons. With your history of high blood pressure, your doctor might want to look at the blood flow to your leg. You might have a narrowing in the arteries that carry blood to your leg. This is easy to test for with an non-invasive radiologic test. Leg pain can also come from problems in your back that are pressing on the nerves that is called spinal stenosis. I think it is unlikely that the stroke is the direct cause of the pain and cramping. If the tests for blood flow are negative you should ask to see a neurologist or physiatrist ( PM&R) to evaluate your leg pain and decide what other tests are needed. If it turns out that the pain is from the stroke , there are medicines we use to treat that type of pain. Good luck.
After your stroke you may be experiencing a new normal, but remember what George Eliot said- It is never too late to be what you might have been. You still can achieve new goals.
 
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asolution replied to Richard C Senelick, MD's response:
Thank you for your reply Dr. I believe you may be correct about the problem stemming from back problems. I appreciate your suggestions


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Richard C. Senelick M.D. is a physician specializing in both neurology and the subspecialty of neurorehabilitation. He did his undergraduate and medic...More

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