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Acute Ischemic Attach
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Anon_181484 posted:
Im a 29 year old male, healthy (running 16 miles a week, eating healthy etc) On March 5th I had a Acute Ischemic Attach that sent me to Stanford Medical Hospital for several days. They gave me the clot buster within 3 hours of the stroke. While I was having all the tests known to man, the only thing that has come up (besides some pending blood work) is a PFO. However they say that this is not what contributed to the clot in my brain.

How are they able to be so certain that the PFO is not a contributor?

What are other things that might cause something like this (im not sure what blood work is pending) Can a type of cancer be a cause of this?

Should I get the PFO fixed?

All my blood work has come back normal.

I have almost make a full recovery (besides some stumbling on words) but the not knowing is weighing me down. I was lucky for this but now I have this fear something may happen again.

Thanks
Ryan
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rosesrred responded:
Hi Ryan, I experienced a TIA 8/31/12 and I have this fear something may happen but worse. The doctor say's keep going to ER when I experience symptoms. I experience tingly numbing through my left arm and leg. Last week, 3/05 I had numbing, eye blurriness and twitching lasted 3 to 4 minutes. I am an old healthy 63 year old 10 mile walker. Just think if we were not healthy...
 
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An_256530 responded:
Ryan, My stroke was February 2014. I, too, had a cryptogenic stroke and found a PFO. It is estimated that 25% of the population has one, but not every one of them has a stroke. They typically don't fix a PFO until there is a 2nd stroke. That sucks, doesn't it? My doctor sent me to a cardiologist who suggested an implantable cardiac monitor. They are looking for a cardiac rhythm called a-fib. Although there is no evidence of a cardiac problem, they are trying to eliminate possible causes. So, I got the implant. It's about the size of a flash drive. I will transmit data monthly and see what it finds. I don't want a-fib, but I'd like to know what the cause was. I understand your fears. I think all stroke survivors feel the same. It's particularly frustrating when you are young and have no known cause. What I'm doing is trying to reduce my chances for another stroke, getting rid of negativity in my life and trying to read as much as possible on the latest stroke information. Stay strong, stay positive and stay informed. Best wishes!
 
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oscardoodle replied to An_256530's response:
My stroke also an ischemic , but from Afib. I'm 61 and had no other health issues. I had been on Metropol and asprin, and now I'm on warifin. The clot lodge on left side lower back of left hemisphere.They saved me with TPA clot buster. I am more tired than usual and make mistakes when I type. It is 3 months now and I'm back at school and try to stay active but tire easy.I too worry some about onset of another stroke. I have drool and my right hand has no feeling in palm area. I am strong as I can resist or pull ,but yet have no feeling in palm and drop thngs withoutknowing cause I can't feel it.Staying positive it important too! Best to you...
 
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ericabme replied to oscardoodle's response:
Well it sounds like you are doing all the right things to prevent another stroke. So just focus on that. Keeping active and taking your meds without fail sounds like the smart thing to do to me. Best of luck to you.


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