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Alcohol of choice...wine
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An_227075 posted:
my father, 64 years old, is a heavy red wine drinker (we are talkin approx a full skinny bottle to a gallon a day if not more). he takes medications as well lisinop, nabumetone and simvastatin for blood pressure, arthritis and cholesterol. i know alcohol should not be taken with any of the medications, but he doesnt understand this. he takes them with coffee or water, but then drinks wine the majority of the day after that. my mom is fet up with it all because when he drinks he starts to dwell on the passing of his brother (2008) from methadone and other pain killer/prescription drug overdose, the death of his mother (2006) and other family members. how do i break the ice to him to stop? my 2 year old daughter goes over there while i am at work, and my mom takes care of her more than he does, and my mother is blind, and if i could afford day care, i would do it because of this. trying to explain things to him, is like nailing jello to a wall, he interrupts you like a teenager and doesnt listen. thinks all should go his way.
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Kayap responded:
You are in a bad situation especially when it comes to the care of your daughter. I hope your mom is 100 percent capable of handling her. Your father is crippled by his disease of addiction and cannot be trusted to care for a two year old. If she isn't you need to find another responsible caregiver for her immediately. I know daycare is expensive but your father is in trouble here. Taking his grand daughter to a babysitter because of his abuse of alcohol may be what he needs to hear right now. Not is a threatening way but a calm "Dad I need to make sure she is safe and you are drinking. It is not safe here for her." Then walk away. He needs to get some professional help. He doesn't understand or see it this way because everyone makes it easy for him to be the way he is. He needs to feel the consequences of his drinking.
When he is ready let him know of AA meetings, rehab available in the area, counseling or an addiction specialist.
Kay
 
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Louise_WebMD_Staff responded:
I encourage you to read this information on helping someone get treatment for alcohol abuse.

Al-Anon can help you and your mother find help, as can local and national numbers found in the front of the phone book.

Also contact your local United Way and ask about day care resources for low income parents. It isn't healthy and could be incredibly dangerous for your child to go to your parents home for child care.

Not because your mom is blind--there are plenty of able bodied blind parents and grandparents who provide excellent care for their children--but because of the alcohol abuse. What happens when the curious tot gets into your father's wine? Or he is so numb he doesn't see her or gets angry or emotional about his family tragedies? That isn't good for the baby and these early years are key.
 
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choclab88 responded:
Wow...I agree with the bottom responder. Maybe you should try Al-Anon...You cannot really call anybody an alcoholic. They have to do that themselves when they are ready. If he sees you are going to Al-Anon, picking a daycare or babysitter (there are resources for childcare) and that you are distancing yourself, then maybe he will go for help because then he will have suffered a consequence. Seeing his grandbaby leave his home because you are scared.


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