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Thyroid and Rage
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mmyprsn posted:
Is there any connection between thyroid issues and rage? Emotional rage is created by chemicals released from the pituitary. Since that is the gland that controls the thyroid gland, it makes sense that there could be a connection. I've searched the web to no avail. What I have found lots of information actually is rage in dogs linked to hyperthyoid. But I haven't really found articles that relate to humans :sheepish: These bouts of rage come out of no where and tend to be very short lived. I can feel it and know what it is, so I have some level of degree of control, but it is quite bothersome none the less.
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DOGDANCING responded:
The Thyroid and the Mind and Emotions thyroid.ca The psychiatric disturbances which accompany hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, the two commonest thyroid disorders, mimic mental illness. People with an overactive thyroid may exhibit marked anxiety and tension, emotional lability, impatience and irritability, distractible overactivity, exaggerated sensitivity to noise, and fluctuating depression with sadness and problems with sleep and the appetite. In extreme cases, they may appear schizophrenic, losing touch with reality and becoming delirious or hallucinating. An underactive thyroid can lead to progressive loss of interest and initiative, slowing of mental processes, poor memory for recent events, fading of the personality's colour and vivacity, general intellectual deterioration, depression with a paranoid flavour, and eventually, if not checked, to dementia and permanent harmful effects on the brain. In instances of each condition, some persons have been wrongly diagnosed, hospitalized for months, and treated unsuccessfully for psychosis. The Thyroid and the Mind and Emotions thyroid.ca Thyroid conditioned can exasperate existing mental problems or even mimic mental illness. Thyroid problem, both underactive and overactive, can cause mood swings. An overactive thyroid may exhibit marked anxiety and tension, emotional liability, impatience and irritability, distractible overactivity, exaggerated sensitivity to noise, and fluctuating depression with sadness and problems with sleep and the appetite. In extreme cases, they may appear schizophrenic, losing touch with reality and becoming delirious or hallucinating. However the most common effect of an overactive thyroid is anxiety. An underactive thyroid can lead to progressive loss of interest and initiative, slowing of mental processes, poor memory for recent events, fading of the personality's color and vivacity, general intellectual deterioration, depression with a paranoid flavor, and eventually, if not checked, to dementia and permanent harmful effects on the brain. In instances of each condition, some persons have been wrongly diagnosed, hospitalized for months, and treated unsuccessfully for psychosis. (source an internet message board for thyroid users)
 
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DOGDANCING responded:
eMedicine - Mental Disorders Secondary to General Medical ... Patients can present in various ways but commonly present with symptoms of anxiety, confusion, and agitated depression. Patients can also present with hypomania and frank psychosis. When hyperthyroidism is suggested, standard clinical symptoms may be present, including heat intolerance, diaphoresis, weight loss despite increased appetite, palpitations, tachycardia, exophthalmos, and hyperactive tendon reflexes (Hutto, 1998). In most patients who present with depression or anxiety associated with hyperthyroidism without other psychiatric history, psychiatric symptoms usually resolve with treatment of the hyperthyroidism. Unless hypothyroidism stems from a primary pituitary disorder, it is usually caused by a lack of T4, which results in an elevated TSH level. Similar to patients with hyperthyroidism, those with hypothyroidism often present with depression and anxiety. The usual clinical features include apathy, psychomotor retardation, depression, and poor memory. However, when hypothyroidism develops rapidly, the psychiatric features are usually delirium and psychosis, which has also been termed myxedema madness. Physical signs and symptoms, including cold intolerance, weight gain, thin and dry hair, facial puffiness, constipation, menorrhagia, muscle cramps, and slowed and decreased deep tendon reflexes, suggest this diagnosis.


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