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    THYROID and INFERTILITY
    avatar
    An_226864 posted:
    Hello !
    Can anyone out there help me?

    I have been trying to get pregnant for over 3 yrs including 2 failed IVF attempts.

    I had a hemithyroidectomy for suspected cancer (it wasn't cancer after all) and then went hypothroid.

    I am now on 75mcg of thyroxine which makes me feel better. It has resulted in a TSH that stays under 2.0 (currently 1.4) and a free T3 of around 3.9. These are all within range so no problem.

    However, my free T4 is consistently higher than the allowed range (around 22 where the top of the allowed range is 19).

    Does ANYBODY have a view on whether this could be reducing / contributing to my fertility problems ? It is very difficult to get a straight answer from doctors as they all seem to have different views.

    I would REALLY appreciate any views. My husband and I desperately want a baby and I am already 37 and worried !

    Sienna
    Reply
     
    avatar
    An_226865 responded:
    Your Free T4's are off the chart high and your Free T3's are too low (if you are reporting value in pmol/L - you didn't indicate the unit of measurement). Your want to get your Free T3's and Free T4's as close to IDEAL, not on the fringes. I'm not a doctor; it's just common sense. Find a doctor who will work on raising your T3's without getting your T4's so high.

    You could try Armour Thyroid as it has T4 and T3 and tends to work for those who don't convert T4 well. Obviously, straight T4 medication is not the answer for you. If your doctor doesn't like Armour, maybe he/she could reduce your thyroxine and add a T3 medication like Cytomel. Once you get pregnant, get monitored frequently to stay well within normal ranges for whatever stage of pregnancy you are in.
     
    avatar
    Andie_WebMD_Staff responded:
    Hi Sienna,

    I hope Anon's post gave you some idea of the numbers you posted. What has your doctor said when you've told him you're trying to conceive?

    Here is a short video that may be helpful: How Your Thyroid Affects Pregnancy .

    Please let us know how things are going and chime in on any of the discussions that you might be able to share your experience on.

    Good luck!!

    Andie
     
    avatar
    shortstak011977 responded:
    Hi Sienna,
    I've had hypothyroid for the last 7 years, I'm now 33 years old & I have a 18 month old. So it is possible to get pregnant. I was at 75 mcg before I got pregnant & my dosage went up to & has stayed at 100 mcg. As far as the numbers go I can't tell you what mine is. I had to start seeing an endocrinologist when I was 5 months pregnant so I would get the right dosage & they don't give me those numbers.
    Hope this helps.
    Jackie


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