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Alternative Treatment for TNBC
clifford1 posted:
This is the first community I have found where there are members who opted not to take chemo. Chemo or no chemo is a personal choice. I had a double mastectomy 6 mths ago and I have been taking Meriva curcumin, exercising and making smoothies. Also, I am trying to eat a Mediterranean diet. My tumor was 1.5cm and no mets. It is still early, however, I will keep you posted. This is a scary and challenging journal; however, tneg is not a death sentence. Patricia Prijatel wrote a book, Surviving Triple Negative Breast Cancer. She highlights women who went the traditional and non-traditional treatment routes. Her blog "Positives About Negative" is a wonderful source of information.
utahbunny responded:
So glad to meet you clifford1! I, too was diagnosed with triple negative and I too did not do chemo. It has been 3.5 years now and am doing fine. I decided to follow a more natural approach and engaged a naturopathic oncologist to direct my program. I am a believe in vitamin c infusions for cancer level. I had micromets in one lymph node. At one point the surgeon wanted to do a mastectomy but instead I opted for another surgery and he couldn't find any more cancer. I had 2 lumps the second one with cancer cells at the margin. You must exercise and mind/body connections is key in my opinion. Would love to correspond with you since I have not been able to find many people who have not done chemo. I did do integrative with radiation and had tremendous results and zero side effects. In fact my whole treatment I have zero side effects. There is hope and it can be done!
clifford1 replied to utahbunny's response:
Hello utahbunny, Your progress is GREAT news. I am encouraged by your progress. I would love to correspond with you also. What is the best way to email each other? I do not want to post my email address on the forum. I would love to get more information about your naturopath doctor.
utahbunny replied to clifford1's response:
I am not sure either as how to give you my email address without posting it for everyone. I did send a message to the contact people here to see what can be done. Will see what they say if anything. Triple negative is treatable and is not the death sentence by any means. The idea with natural is building up the immune system. Critical. Also exercising is very important. the key is finding a professional who is natural and specializes in cancer. My finding was a very experienced naturopathic oncologist located in Scottsdale, Arizona. Will see what they say about the email. Beta glucans, antioxidants, mushroom extracts are your friends. Sugar is not your friend.
utahbunny replied to utahbunny's response:
Clifford1-thiere are others that have alternative groups where you can do email back and forth and messages. You might want to look at inspire and they have an alternative group that I am involved in. Hope all is well with you and remember that there are people who are diagnosed with TNBC and are doing very well. And some of those people did not do chemo. It is possible and in my mind a healthier approach to this. Good luck and hope to hear from you soon.
watertiger replied to utahbunny's response:

I live in Scottsdale AZ and both my sister and I have breast cancer. My sister has TNBC but lives in the east coast. I'd love to find out who your naturopathic oncologist is. Is it Dr. Ruben of Naturopathic Specialist?
utahbunny replied to watertiger's response:
Yes it is and I highly recommend him. I am getting close to my 5 year mark and no side effects and my immune system has never been better thanks to him. I feel he really cares about his patients and is very kind. Let me know if you do see him. His staff is also excellent
chocolategirl622 responded:
im so glad i met you, i was diagnose april 2014, and I like you haven't had chemo or radiation. Today the tumor on feel has grown. It's hard to get help because every doctor want traditional treatment. i would like to talk to you about your alternative treatment. I'm now bleeding from my nose so I know I have too do something even if it means that they take my breast and then I can go back to alternative treatment. I have done well for a year. I pray that your still doing well
clifford1 replied to chocolategirl622's response:
I am sad to read about your diagnosis. Since TN is so aggressive, I elected to have surgery immediately. Therefore, I had standard treatment, but, I did not do the systemic treatment (chemo and radiation). For me, it was not an option to leave the cancer in my body. The cancer size, stage and node involvement should be considered when weighing treatment options.
utahbunny replied to chocolategirl622's response:
chocolategirl622--it has been close to 6 years now with my naturopathic approach to TNBC and am doing just fine ---latest blood work up shows low inflammation. If you are not doing the traditional you must do other things. Mine was vitamin c infusions, plant food diet and being seen by a naturopathic oncologist to direct my program. You need beta glucans, and other supplements to help with the cancer. Also mind/body therapies are essential to these programs.
triplenegativebc replied to utahbunny's response:
Hello! My mom was diagnosed with stage 2A breast cancer. No lymph nodes affected. The blood test results came back as triple negative. She had mastectomy on her left breast a week back. Cancer hasn't spread to any other parts of her body. We haven't met the oncologist yet, but her surgeon feels she will probably have to do the chemo. My mom is 71, and she has osteoporosis so she is hesitant about doing chemo. She is worried about the side effects on her bones. While I understand TNBC is a very aggressive form of BC, I would like to know if it would be better for her to forego the chemotherapy. Thank you.
utahbunny replied to triplenegativebc's response:
There is plenty that she can do that isn't invasive---first of I wouldn't recommend a senior going thru chemo but that is just me. I was also diagnosed with stage 2a, grade 3 TNBC and I did not do chemo and it has been close to 6 years now. Instead I went through naturopathic medicine but she needs to really commit to this---plant food diet very restrictive for some time--no meat, no dairy, no grains and tremendous reduction in sugar. If she can get vitamin c infusions cancer level normally done by naturopaths that is going to help her in my mind a lot more than chemo can. It will help boost her immune system and it one of the 2 top rated protocols in natural. Probably needs to get in contact with a naturopathic oncologist---now they don't have to be located in your state mine is not and most of the time consults are done over the phone. If you can't find one I can recommend someone to you. That person can tell her specifically what to take in the form of supplements and immune boosters, how much to take, and when to take them. Very critical. She needs to exercise and a must in this program is mind/body therapies such as qi-gong, tai-chi, yoga, medication, visualization. Hope this helps--it can be done but the person needs to be totally committed to this especially the diet--no desserts on this one.
clifford1 replied to triplenegativebc's response:
The decision regarding chemo or no chemo is individualized and one that you have to be at peace with. TNBC is not one disease, therefore the outcomes with standard treatment are mixed. I can send you an article from the New England Journal of Medicine. A lot of women do well and a lot of women don't after chemo.There are six TN subtypes. Some subtypes are more aggressive than others. Since no one has found it important enough to research which subtypes respond better to a particular chemo and since its not standard practice to determine the biology of each person's tumor, chemo is pretty experimental. Ask your onco to give you your mom's survival stats from Adjuvant Online. Consider your mom's current health issues. Thoroughly research the side effects of the chemo the onco recommends. Since your mom is 70, hopefully they wont recommend red devil, Adriamycin, because it affects the heart. Do a regret matrix so you are at ease with your decision. For example, if you do chemo and the cancer comes back, you will be okay because you were at peace with your decision. If you don't agree to chemo and the cancer comes back, you will be fine because you were at peace with your decision. I was and still is at peace with refusing chemo. I was stage 1, no node involvement and healthy. I agree with utahbunny, you have to eat right, exercise and decompress mentally. I only take vitamin d and a probiotic. My onco is not big on supplements. I take Life Extensions Curcumin sometimes. I took it regularly for a year. I am 3 years out. Sending clarity in your decision making progress.
triplenegativebc replied to clifford1's response:
Thank you Utahbunny and Clifford. My mom's oncologist says she has to go for either a short intensive 3 months treatment of AC chemotherapy or a year's treatment of CMF. She recommends the CMF due to my mom's age. I had looked up on the internet about those treatments, and I feel it would be better for my mom not to go through with the chemo. The onco said she can postpone the chemo treatment even up to a year. I don't get this part. I mean if TN is an aggressive type of cancer so if she is going to get the chemo treatment, shouldn't the onco be pushing for the chemo straight away? I thought you have to start the chemo within 60 days. My mom is meeting the naturopathic physician and see what he says. My mom does eat a well balanced diet but I do have a question regarding tofu. Is she not supposed to be eating it? On another note, has anyone read about the article on RoseHip extract? I don't know if the link will go through or not, but here it is:
Thank you again for all the advice and wishes. I really appreciate them.
clifford1 replied to triplenegativebc's response:
I empathize with what your mom is dealing with. Please get a second onco opinion before you make a final decision on which chemo to take. I have never heard of waiting a year for chemo. CMF are older chemo cocktails. If you live near a National Cancer Institute or teaching hospital, that would be great. There are different opinions on tofu. Fermented and organic should be okay. The naturopath should be a good resource.

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I was diagnosed with triple negative bc July 2009 with micromets in 1 lymph node. My path is different than most. I have gone thru naturopathic treatm...More

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