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    Too Young for Type 1?
    avatar
    An_226308 posted:
    I just checked my daughter's sugar (out of fun) while I was checking mine, she thought it was fun>>>>she is 3. Her sugar level was 205 within 15 mins. of eating breakfast, so I wondered if she is too young to be getting diabetes? Her natural father died at age 18 from a diabetic coma and had been diagnosed as a type 1 at the age of 9. Is this something that I should worry about? or is it possibly just because she had just eaten? I am new to diabetes and still learning about my type 2 and learning to monitor my levels.
    We do not allow her to have sugar and don't plan to start anytime in the future b ecause of the diabetes that runs in her fathers family. He was type 1, both parents are type 2, all grandparents are type 2, I am type 2 and my father is type 2. Native American as well.
    Any suggestions or comments are welcome as I am new and still learning.
    I am going to check her levels again in another 1 1/2 and see if they are still up. At what point would I need to call the doctor?
    Reply
     
    avatar
    arealgijoe responded:
    -1- There is NO such thing as too old or too young.
    ...They are learning the age stereo-type not always fit.

    -2- It is GOOD that you watch your daughter. You know the signs.

    -3- If there are no signs or no apparent problem make sure her doc checks her on a regular basis.

    Better safe than sorry...

    Times have CHANGED a lot in my 30 years since I was hauled off in an ambulance and admited to the hospital for diabetes. There is no reason even a young person can not do or be anything and live a long healthy life.

    Gomer :-(
     
    avatar
    mayborn replied to arealgijoe's response:
    I totally agree!! I was 32 and started losing weight, was always hungry and thristy, and was having trouble with my eyesight. When I saw my doc on a Saturday, he thought I was type 2, although I am 5'8" and weighed 132 lbs. He started me on oral meds. The next Thursday, I was in the ER in ketoacidosis. I cried when I was admitted into the hospital and told I was type 1. It was very tough to adjust to, but am now 50 and still alive! LOL.
     
    avatar
    MrsCora01 responded:
    Even a non-diabetic can spike shortly after eating, but you are right to test at the 2 hour mark. As gomer said, there is no such thing as too young or too old. And unfortunately, genetics are stacked against you r daughter for at least some type of diabetes. Keep her healthy with diet and exercise and remain vigilant.

    Best of luck.

    Cora


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