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    Blood sugar spikes. Please educate me.
    avatar
    daddyb987 posted:
    My girlfriend who is 43 was just diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. We went to the hospital after she complained about tiredness, she lost 20 pounds in about 3 weeks, and her legs were feeling very heavy. When they admitted her, her blood sugar was 380. It remained that way for three days even though she was given insulin throughout the entire stay. On the last day it was reading around 180 for the last two tests and they discharged her, prescribing insulin and gave her a tester. Last night before she took her insulin she tested herself and it was above 400 just hours after being discharged!!!! She gave herself the insulin shot at 9 as instructed by the doctor at the hospital. This morning it was 180 again. She had a hard boiled egg and dry toast for breakfast. By 10 this morning it was back around 380!!!! Why would she keep spiking like this. I'm worried about her since everything I've read, anything above 300 she should be at the doctors immediately. She was instructed to only take the insulin once a day but it seems it's only helping for just a short period of time. We are both new to this and would like any help and advice that you have.
    Reply
     
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    MrsCora01 responded:
    Hi and welcome. Does she have a follow up appointment with an endocrinologist? If she has been diagnosed with type 1, then 1 shot per day will not work for her (they haven't done that since the 70s). I'm guessing that the one shot is lantus (a long acting insulin).

    As a T1 she will eventually be on MDI (multiple daily injections) and there will be all sorts of things to learn like insulin to carb ratios and insulin sensitivity. But don't worry too much about that for now. As for the high glucose levels - she will not get permanent damage in the short run. And I would suggest getting to see a good endo to get things sorted out. Diabetes is a pain in the butt, but it is doable and you can live a long, healthy, and happy life with it. This is a nice place, but there are not too many T1s. I would recommend Diabetes Daily as there are dozens of us there with a couple of hundred years of experience between us.

    Hope this helps a bit. Feel free to ask lots of questions.

    Cora
     
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    sbeth654 responded:
    She MUST see an endocrinologist. I too was diagnosed with Type 1 as an older adult, and for some reason this seems to confuse a lot of doctors. I was very sick because the doctors kept treating me with Type 2 medicaitons, my blood sugars stayed in the 600's for months. I was eating 6,000 to 8,000 calories a day and losing three pounds a week. I did not know they even had diabetes specialists, but when I finally found the right doctor, he checked me into the hospital and diabetes education classes. Within 24 hours of checking into the hospital my blood sugars were in the normal range of 80-120. If she is not getting the results she is wanting to get better control, she should look around for a proactive doctor, one that encourages her to take charge of her health. In the meantime she should start reading about carb counting because that is a great tool for Type 1 diabetics. She might want to check if her insurance will pay for the insulin pump. Its not for everyone, but it can be a a really great tool. There are also great diabetes support groups (in person and on the net).

    I agree with MrsCora01 that it sounds like someone is not treating her correctly, and this is exactly what happened to me. I was VERY sick until I decided that I needed to get a second opinion. When I went to an endocrinologist, my blood sugars were brought under control almost immediately. FIND A DIFFERENT DOCTOR!


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