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12 year old female with Gross Hematuria
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jamiepen posted:
I have a 12 year old daughter and couple months ago I had to take her to the ER for severe pain in her L side. They ran a CT and discovered that she had signs of passing a kidney stone. They also found that she has some very tiny stones remaining. On Oct 31st while we was trick or treating she began to have pain once again. She was able to continue to trick or treat but kept complaining so we went home. The pain lasted for an hour and a half. The next evening she went to the bathroom and her urine looked like tea. I immediately loaded her up and to the ER we went. They did not want to do a CT due to having done one just a couple months ago. They only tests ran was Blood work to check her CBC and her kidney functions as well as her sugar. Everything came back fine except for she had some nitrates so they placed her on a sulfa drug. It has been 8 days since she started the antibiotic and every now and again she will have a little pain in her L side and then you will see the gross amounts of blood in her urine once again. I am currently waiting to hear from her docs office for an appointment with a Urologist. My question is, could this be from the UTI she has or could this be a possible Stone that is moving slowly and cutting her causing the pain. I have stones but when I have them I am in so much pain I can't move she seems to tolerate this pain very well. Thanks in advance for any info you can give me.
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counterso responded:
UTIs are dangerous and need to be promptly treated with antibiotics. But you want evidence of an actual UTI before treatment. This is done with a urine culture that looks for both the presence of bacteria colonies, AND tests to see which antibiotic is effective against the particular strain of bacteria present. A prophylactic dosage of Cipro is a bad idea.

After the antibiotic course she should always follow up with 30 days of probiotics which will help restore the beneficial flora in her gut that account for about 80% of her immune system.

Kidney stones are nearly 100% a function of diet. As her parent, you control her diet, so you are responsible for the formation of all the kidney stones she has today. Aside from the daily WATER intake she should have, reducing the stone forming foods (following a low-oxalate diet) is going to be an important habit for her whole life that needs to start now. You may also find benefit from supplementation to manage her urine chemistry such as TheraLith XR (check with her urologist).

I suggest a resource of kidney stone information at http://www.urologystone.com which has over 3000 pages of information on kidney stones. There's sure to be information there useful for both of you.

Most assuredly she still has stones that have already formed and will be passing, even if not visible to the eye.

Immediate modification of her diet (and yours) is essential.
 
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jamiepen replied to counterso's response:
I took her to the Urologist today. She has kidney Stones due to them being hereditary not because of anything I have done. I know all about stones because I have suffered w/ them the past 15 years. She is now on amoxicilen for a month to see if that will clear things up. She has vesicoureteral reflux.
 
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counterso replied to jamiepen's response:
The propensity of kidney stone formation is hereditary, but the control of them is dietary. Good luck!


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